Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

April 12, 2017

Memorials III / Monumentos a los caídos III / Monuments aux morts III / Memoriais de guerra III

Part III. Parte III

In English:

When photographing churches, it is quite natural to visit on local cemeteries. What is eye striking, are war memorials or as we call them: “Pro Patria” in English “For the Fatherland” statues. Some of them are great, some less great, because some villages are poor. This is quite understandable because total number of deaths was 90 000 and wounded nearly 200 000. This means that in many small villages there were after war nearly young children and old men. Women had to do same work than their decedent husbands and also their own work. But the war is not the only one thing were people died. In 1866–1868 we had great famine. During those years eight percent of total number of our population died. In numbers that is 115707 persons. Also in 1695—1697 we had bigger famine and then 150000 died. That number was about one third about the whole population.

En español:

Al fotografiar iglesias, es bastante natural visitar en cementerios locales. Lo que salta a la vista son monumentos a los caídos o como nosotros los llamamos: “Pro Patria” o en español “Por la Patria” estatuas. Algunos de ellos son espectaculares algunos no lo estan, porque algunos pueblos son pobres. Esto es bastante entendible porque el número de total de muertes fue 90 000 e hirió casi 200 000. Esto significa que en muchas pequeñas aldeas allí habían después de guerrea solamente niños y a ancianos casi jóvenes. Las mujeres tuvieron que hacer mismo trabajo que sus maridos difuntos y además sus propio trabajo. Pero la guerra no es el cosa único dónde fue personas muertas. En 1866–1868 tuvimos el gran hambre. Durante esos años ocho por ciento del número total de nuestra población moría. En los números eso hace 115707 personas. También en 1695—1697 tuvimos más gran hambre y entonces 150000 morían. Ese número estuvo acerca de la tercera parte acerca de la población entera.

En francais:

En photographiant des églises, c’est tout à fait naturel pour visiter les cimetières locaux. Ce qui frappe l’oeil sont des monuments aux morts ou comme nous les appelons : “Pro Patria” ou en français “Pour la patrie” statues. Certains d’elles sont grandes, quelques-unes moins grandes, parce que certains villages sont pauvres. Ceci est tout à fait compréhensible parce que le nombre total de morts était 90 000 et a blessé presque 200 000. Ceci signifie que dans beaucoup de villages petits il y avait après la guerre presque jeunes enfants et les vieil hommes. Les femmes ont dû faire le même travail que leurs défunts maris et de plus leur propre travail. Mais la guerre n’est pas le seul chose quand des gens mouraient. Dans 1866–1868 nous avons eu la grande famine. Pendant ces ans huit pourcent de nombre total de notre population mourait. Dans les nombres c’est 115707 personnes. Aussi dans 1695—1697 nous avons eu la plus grande famine et alors 150000 mouraient. Ce nombre était d’un tiers de la population entière.

Em Português:

Ao fotografar igrejas, é bastante natural para visitar em cemitérios locais. O que é surpreendente olho, são memoriais de guerra ou como lhes chamamos: “Pro Patria” e em portugues “pela pátria” estátuas. Alguns deles são espetaculares alguns não são, porque algumas pessoas são pobres também igrejas. Isto é bastante compreensível, porque o número total de mortes foi de 90 000 e feriu cerca de 200 000. Isto significa que, em muitas pequenas aldeias houve depois da guerra quase crianças jovens e velhos. As mulheres tinham que fazer mesmo trabalho do que seus maridos falecido e também o seu próprio trabalho. Mas a guerra não é a única coisa que eram pessoas morreram. Em 1866-1868, tivemos grande fome. Durante esses anos, oito por cento do número total de nossa população morreu. Em números que é 115.707 pessoas. Também em 1695-1697 tivemos fome maior e, em seguida, 150 mil morreram. Esse número foi de cerca de um terço sobre toda a população.

Anttola

Anttola

Eno

Eno

Hirvensalmi

Hirvensalmi

Hyrynsalmi

Hyrynsalmi

Jalasjarvi

Jalasjarvi

Joroinen

Joroinen

Juva

Juva

Jyvaskyla

Jyvaskyla

Kangasniemi

Kangasniemi

Kauhajoki

Kauhajoki

Kerimaki

Kerimaki

Maaninka

Maaninka

Mantyharju

Mantyharju

Myrskyla

Myrskyla

Pieksamaki

Pieksamaki

Pielavesi

Pielavesi

Piippola

Piippola

Puumala

Puumala

Renko

Renko

Saarijarvi

Saarijarvi

Savonlinna

Savonlinna

Sonkajarvi

Sonkajarvi

Tammisaari

Tammisaari

Utsjoki

Utsjoki

Viitasaari

Viitasaari

Memorials I / Monumentos a los caídos I / Monuments aux morts I / Memoriais de guerra I

Memorials II / Monumentos a los caídos II / Monuments aux morts II / Memoriais de guerra II

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57 Comments »

  1. I think that war and famine should not exist in the future, only in the past.

    Comment by wakasahs15th — April 12, 2017 @ 09:01 | Reply

    • Hello Wakashs15th.

      Thank You for Your comment. I wish that Your wise words would be true in the future. These statues present “unknown” Finland, which can be seen everywhere in Finland for those who want to know more about our history. Finland is celebrating this year its 100 years independency and that is why I presented these heart-moving statues.

      こんばんは.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 12, 2017 @ 09:08 | Reply

  2. Thank you for showing us these interesting statues commemorating those who lost their lives in the war, so sad but your photos are really nice.

    Comment by Little Miss Traveller — April 12, 2017 @ 09:32 | Reply

    • Hello Marion.

      Thank You. You may know that this year Finland celebrates its 100 years independency. I am one of those few lucky bloggers, who have been selected to express their own thoughts about

      Suomi Finland 100 years.

      I also tell much more how I experienced my country during my life until this moment and my thoughts about how my country could be more competitive in future. If interested, read it.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 12, 2017 @ 12:22 | Reply

      • How wonderful that you have been selected to recall your memories to celebrate Finland’s centenary, I’ll look forward to reading them.

        Comment by Little Miss Traveller — April 12, 2017 @ 13:21 | Reply

  3. Hope we won’t have any more wars and famine in the future…………
    All these statues recall grief and death….Moving pictures, really!

    Comment by 76sanfermo — April 12, 2017 @ 10:01 | Reply

    • Hello Anna.

      I appreciate Your comment. Thank You.

      Have a good day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 12, 2017 @ 12:31 | Reply

    • agree w/anna: “Moving”. sad, cause for reflection, introspection, yet “moving”

      Comment by betunada — April 19, 2017 @ 20:04 | Reply

      • Hello Betunada.

        Thank You leaving Your kind comment,

        Have a nice day!

        Comment by Sartenada — April 20, 2017 @ 07:19 | Reply

  4. Thank you so much for posting these moving artworks. As a Canadian who is just starting to learn about her Finnish roots, I had heard vaguely about the wars, but not the famines. I think these images did more to help me understand the heart and strength of my people than anything else I have seen before. I have been working on my family tree and am going back now, to see how many family members were lost during these time periods.

    Comment by Terry Peltomaa Fleckney — April 12, 2017 @ 15:43 | Reply

    • Hello Terry.

      I am very glad that You did find my post, got some information and loved my photos. Thank You for Your visit, I hope that You will return. Someday in the future, You can see and know why on countryside our bell towers are separated from churches.

      Happy Easter. Matti.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 07:23 | Reply

  5. Very moving photos Sartenada. They tell a sad story but one that must be remembered.

    Comment by Karen — April 12, 2017 @ 15:48 | Reply

    • Hello Karen.

      Thank You giving so kind comment. I love it.

      Happy Easter.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 07:26 | Reply

  6. While some of these memorials are ‘more grand’ than others, all of them are very moving. Thank you for sharing all of them with us.

    Comment by seniorhiker — April 12, 2017 @ 16:07 | Reply

    • Hello George.

      Nice and wise words. Thank You.

      Happy Easter.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 07:38 | Reply

  7. Each of statues is moving.
    I think of past.
    And I think of future.

    Comment by 洋子 — April 12, 2017 @ 18:13 | Reply

    • Hello 洋子.

      I am glad that You left Your kind comment. Thank You.

      こんばんは.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 07:40 | Reply

  8. Lovely pictures once again. The memorial in Kauhajoki I just visited last summer and in that church my parents got married back in the 80s 🙂

    Comment by CrazyChineseFamily — April 12, 2017 @ 20:38 | Reply

    • Hello Timo.

      What a coincidence! Thank You for leaving Your praising comment.

      Have a good day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 07:42 | Reply

  9. Sad, but those wonderful monuments help keep us from forgetting.

    Comment by montucky — April 12, 2017 @ 22:08 | Reply

    • Hello Terry.

      This is, as You said. Thank You for Your comment.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 10:04 | Reply

  10. These statues are expressive – and as the reason for their existence is a sad one, it’s (even today and without knowing anyone of the people who lost their life) hard to see the dispirited eyes or the desperate and grieving posture. But some statues are different and to me they seem to have a very peaceful, forgiving and strengthening “aura” – if one can speak of aura in case of a statue. I specially think of the one with the title “Saarijarvi”. It’s absolutely beautiful!

    Thanks for for showing these memorials and for telling about the background, Matti!

    Wishing you a nice week and Happy Easter!
    Michèle

    Comment by ladyfromhamburg — April 12, 2017 @ 22:26 | Reply

    • Hello Michèle.

      For us who have are born at war time or later, we have heard so many tragic stories which will end up slowly sink into oblivion, but these memorials tell the story to those, who are curious and want to know their history. I have not thought that statues could have aura, but why not. Many dogs seem to see auras and we have, because nearly every dog greets us on the street wagging their tail and wants to sniff us. 🙂 Thank You.

      Happy Easter. Matti.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 10:16 | Reply

  11. Thank you for showing these memorials. One can learn so much from the past,if one will listen.i also enjoyed reading the link that shared a writing of yours. Happy Easter!!

    Comment by Deb — April 13, 2017 @ 01:43 | Reply

    • Hello Deb.

      Thank you for Your kind comment and it was wonderful to read that You loved my story concerning Suomi Finland 100 years.

      Happy Easter.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 10:19 | Reply

  12. Hello.
    It seems that these statues hope to become a world without war and hunger.

    Comment by saganhama — April 13, 2017 @ 01:52 | Reply

    • Hello Saganhama.

      Thank You for Your kind comment with wise words.

      こんばんは.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 10:35 | Reply

  13. These statues and monuments are unlike any I’ve seen. Very beautiful. I hope I get the chance to see some of them while I’m here. Thank you for sharing this part of Finland’s fascinating history.
    Emily

    Comment by egutman27gmailcom — April 13, 2017 @ 12:23 | Reply

    • Hello Emily.

      I wish also that You could see them. They are mainly on countryside. On our countryside, there are incredible beautiful churches, which beat those in town. During this spring, I show beautiful bell towers, especially those which are separated from the church itself. Thank You. P.S. I will wave to You, if I recognize You. 🙂

      Happy Easter. Matti.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 13, 2017 @ 13:06 | Reply

  14. What a beautiful, poignant collection of photos–the range of styles is fascinating.

    Comment by KerryCan — April 13, 2017 @ 13:41 | Reply

    • Hello Kerry.

      I am glad that You loved my photos. Thank You leaving Your kind comment.

      Happy Easter.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 14, 2017 @ 10:48 | Reply

  15. Sad but true. There are some beautiful works here. Happy Easter to you, Sartenada! 🙂 🙂

    Comment by restlessjo — April 13, 2017 @ 19:44 | Reply

    • Hello Johanna.

      Thank You for Your wise words, I appreciate them.

      Happy Easter.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 14, 2017 @ 10:54 | Reply

  16. Hello Sartenada,

    War is the sad history (and current reality) of mankind… I wish we can learn from the past, but sadly the same mistakes are repeated. But, we have to try and keep hope. Thank you for sharing this history of your country.

    Warm wishes,
    Takami

    Comment by T Ibara Photo — April 14, 2017 @ 02:12 | Reply

    • Hello Takami.

      I appreciate Your kind comment very much. Thank You.

      良い 週末!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 14, 2017 @ 10:56 | Reply

  17. Obrigada por mostrar essa parte da história que nao conhecemos! Muito triste e emocionante!
    Feliz Páscoa para você e todos da sua família!
    Abracos,
    Claudia

    Comment by claudialasetzki — April 15, 2017 @ 10:39 | Reply

    • Oi Claudia.

      Como agradável ler que você aprendeu mais sobre o meu país através das minhas fotos. O seu comentário amável aquecia o meu coração muito.Obrigado. Feliz Páscoa para você além disso.

      Abracos,
      Matti.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 15, 2017 @ 11:35 | Reply

  18. Many statue,
    I think peoples take great care of history.
    Thanks for your photos!

    Comment by キース — April 15, 2017 @ 11:32 | Reply

    • Hello Keith.

      I love Your wise words. Thank You.

      すばらしい日を過してください。

      Comment by Sartenada — April 15, 2017 @ 11:46 | Reply

  19. so important to remind the history

    Comment by Bernieshoot — April 15, 2017 @ 12:19 | Reply

    • Bonjour Bernard.

      Thank You very much leaving Your kind comment.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 15, 2017 @ 13:08 | Reply

  20. Great pictures of these beautiful monuments and statues, Matti! I had only seen very few of them “live”.

    Comment by Tiny — April 15, 2017 @ 15:18 | Reply

    • Hello Helen.

      I am glad that You have seen some of them. Then You know how well they are cherished ion our graveyards. Thank You for Your kind comment.

      Happy Sunday!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 16, 2017 @ 06:44 | Reply

  21. Beautiful photos – some are very sad but they are all dignified and respectful.

    Comment by megtraveling — April 16, 2017 @ 19:52 | Reply

    • Hello Meg.

      Thank You leaving your kind comment. I am glad that You loved my photos.

      Have a good day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 17, 2017 @ 10:48 | Reply

  22. The loss of people is always so sad, may it be war of famine. Let’s pray that will never be the case again. Lovely pictures.

    Comment by utesmile — April 17, 2017 @ 18:55 | Reply

    • Hello Ute.

      Your kind words warm my heart. Thank You.

      Have nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 18, 2017 @ 06:53 | Reply

  23. Great photos of beautiful monuments.
    I love the backgrounds as well, the weather always looks perfect and the gardens very inviting.

    Comment by Tokeloshe — April 17, 2017 @ 22:44 | Reply

    • Hello Tokeloshe.

      Thank You for Your kind comment. I am glad that You noticed backgrounds also. Graveyards are great place to find art. In Paris, the cemetery of Père-Lachaise is fantastic a good example. We have been there thrice.

      Have a good day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 18, 2017 @ 07:01 | Reply

  24. Wow, that’s a lot of very interesting information. Makes me think that it would be interesting to photograph cemeteries in different countries, to show how grief and remembrance is expressed in different cultures

    Comment by travelsidenotes — April 18, 2017 @ 10:10 | Reply

    • Hello Travelsidenotes.

      I am glad that You loved my post and got a great idea. We have talked many times with my wife, that who is the first, who will publish a book about cemeteries where famous persons are buried. I have shot photos from many churches in Finland. On countryside, bell towers are separated mainly from the churches and there is a heavy reason to it. During this spring, I will publish again a post presenting beautiful bell towers. Thank You for Your praising comment.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 18, 2017 @ 12:07 | Reply

  25. So much history and sacrifice. You have captured the memorials beautifully.

    Comment by Sue Slaght — April 19, 2017 @ 15:20 | Reply

    • Hello Sue.

      I appreciate your kind words very much. Thank You.

      Have a good day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 20, 2017 @ 07:14 | Reply

    • Hello Sue.

      I appreciate your kind words very much. Thank You.

      Have a good day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 20, 2017 @ 07:14 | Reply

  26. Such a heartfelt tribute… the statues are beautiful: the expressions on their faces seeem to say so many things, even from the silence….
    Sending love & best wishes, dear Sartenada 😀

    Comment by Aquileana — April 20, 2017 @ 00:18 | Reply

    • Hello Aquileana.

      Thank You. We yet have old veterans who suffer from their war experiences. Some talk, some not. It must have been terrible. I am glad that You loved these memorials.

      Have a good day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 20, 2017 @ 07:31 | Reply


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