Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

March 9, 2012

Beyond the Arctic Circle 10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico 10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique 10

In English:

Kirkenes, Norway.

Kirkenes is the turning point of our holiday. The town is small having about 3300 inhabitants. There is not much to be seen. We visited in the church of Kirkenes and inside there were beautiful rugs. Then I have photos from the memorial dedicated to Russian soldiers, if I understand the text in Norwegian. The rest of my photos show some buildings and awesome bear statue in the beginning of this post.

En español:

Kirkenes, Noruega.

Kirkenes es el punto de volver de nuestras vacaciones. La ciudad de Kirkenes es pequeña y tiene alrededor de 3.300 habitantes. No hay mucho que ver. Visitamos allí en la iglesia de Kirkenes y dentro habían hermosas alfombras. Entonces tengo fotos del monumento conmemorativo dicado a los soldados rusos, si he entendido el texto en noruego correcto. El resto de mis fotos muestran a Ustedes algunos edificios y una estatua de oso impresionante.

En francais:

Kirkenes, Norvège.

Kirkenes est le point tournant de nos vacances. La ville est petite avec environ 3300 habitants. Il n’ya pas beaucoup à voir. Nous avons visité dans l’église de Kirkenes et à l’intérieur on peut trouver de nombreuses belles tapis. Puis,je pris des photos du mémorial dédié aux soldats russes, si je comprends le texte en norvégien correctement. Le reste de mes photos á Vous montrent des bâtiments et une statue impressionnante d’un ours.

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Beyond the Arctic Circle10 / Más allá del Círculo Polar Ártico10 / Au-delà du Cercle arctique10

Part 9 / parte 9
Part 11 / parte 11

31 Comments »

  1. Thanks for the tour. I have been above the Arctic Circle in Canada, It is good to see a view from Norway.

    Comment by Maggie L R — March 9, 2012 @ 08:08 | Reply

    • Hello Maggie.

      Sounds great. I have only two posts from Norway and all the rest are from Finland showing our car trip beyond the Arctic Circle in 2011. In 2006 we were also in Norway making a car trip to Nordkapp, the Northernmost point in Europe. That place was full with more beautiful scenes. To me to see how churches are looking at Arctic areas interesting. The church in Kirkenes differs from those we have in Finland.

      Happy Friday!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 9, 2012 @ 08:25 | Reply

  2. I loved how you displayed the photos smaller then bigger and vice versa. Cool! Have a great weekend!

    Comment by Travel Spirit — March 9, 2012 @ 15:14 | Reply

    • Hello Sherry.

      Thank You for the compliment. In this post it was “obligatory” to do so that people can see the whole and its parts. I hoped indeed that doing in that way, one can feel himself / herself that he / she is approaching the altar to see it in detailed pieces.

      Happy week-end to You and Yours!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 9, 2012 @ 15:20 | Reply

  3. I loved the bear too.

    Comment by kareninhonolulu — March 9, 2012 @ 18:43 | Reply

    • Hi Karen.

      To find statues of bear also in Kirkenes was nice surprise to me. My favorite is the first photo, it is frightening.

      Happy Saturday!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 10, 2012 @ 08:35 | Reply

      • I just thought about it. My grandson’s nickname is Bear.

        Comment by kareninhonolulu — March 11, 2012 @ 00:22 | Reply

      • Oh and my brother went by Sun Bear as his name for his paintings when He lived in Holland.

        Comment by kareninhonolulu — March 11, 2012 @ 00:22 | Reply

        • Karen, I liked Your additional comments. Thank You. In Finnish we have many words for bear: “Karhu, Otso, Ohto, Mesikämmen, Kontio, Nalle”. The word Karhu is most known and used, then comes Otso and Mesikämmen. The word Mesikämmen can be translated palm of honey. Nalle is also popular and it is used when people are talking about Teddy bears. Karhu is used also as family name. Karhunen is diminutive form Karhu, meaning small bear.

          Happy Sunday!

          Comment by Sartenada — March 11, 2012 @ 09:23 | Reply

  4. Hello Matti,
    Le crucifix est original et méritait ces photos de détails.
    Beaucoup de clarté et de couleurs aussi dans cette église… pour faire contrepoids à l’austérité du mémorial.
    Bises et bon week-end.

    Comment by Marion B. — March 9, 2012 @ 19:00 | Reply

    • Bonjour Marion.

      Merci beaucoup. Moi, je trouve que la couleur verte est très rare dans les l’églises. Aussi j’ai jamais vu les tapises en tissu dans les égises, bien sûr que dans les maisons.

      Bon week-end et bises.

      Comment by Sartenada — March 10, 2012 @ 08:45 | Reply

  5. I love all the photos 🙂

    Comment by Northern Narratives — March 9, 2012 @ 19:51 | Reply

    • Hi Northern Narratives.

      I am very glad that my photos pleased to You.

      Happy Saturday!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 10, 2012 @ 08:46 | Reply

  6. What gorgeous photos of the church. I always think it’s so interesting to see what insides of various churches look like and how they are decorated!

    Comment by Ducky's Always Hungry — March 10, 2012 @ 00:39 | Reply

    • Hello Alisa.

      I find it the same way than You that to see churches inside is interesting. Never one cannot imagine what to find there. In this case green color was to me a surprise. Also to find so many cloth rugs hanging there. Those kinds of rugs are very popular in homes in Finland, but to find them and so many inside the church was a big surprise to me. In homes they have of course different themes.

      Have a lovely day!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 10, 2012 @ 08:52 | Reply

  7. I enjoyed seeing all of the photos. The simple elegance of the church is just awesome!

    Comment by montucky — March 10, 2012 @ 04:25 | Reply

    • Hi Terry.

      Thank You for Your comment. You are so right because this church has simple elegance and that it is not decorated with gold everywhere as nearly all churches are in the Central and Southern Europe. This means that a man can easily to concentrate on the matter, for which a man has come to the church. Art inside churches is beautiful and it tunes the man to receive the word of our Lord, but one has to keep in mind the original meaning of church.

      In Finland Orthodox churches are decorated with art which is in practice Orthodox icons, chandeliers and paintings of Saints. Icons are some kind of “windows” to the world of our Lord presenting historic happenings of religion and Saints.

      Happy week-end!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 10, 2012 @ 08:59 | Reply

  8. It seems that there are bears everywhere up there😉
    And there is a beautiful up there – north of the Arctic Circle.
    Thank you for taking us up there!

    Comment by truels — March 10, 2012 @ 13:54 | Reply

    • Hi Truels.

      You are so right that bears seem to be everywhere indeed. Last photos from bears You’ll see in my next post when we are driving back from Kirkenes, Norway to Inari, Finland. Then You start to see reindeers.🙂

      Happy Sunday!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 11, 2012 @ 09:29 | Reply

  9. Very nice series… I’m a big fan of these bears ! Have a lovely weekend Matti🙂

    Comment by Tamara — March 11, 2012 @ 15:57 | Reply

    • Hello Tamara.

      That was so nice to read. Thank You.

      Happy Sunday to You and Yours!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 11, 2012 @ 16:27 | Reply

  10. Like the other commenters, I find the inside of the church beautiful. Very striking in color and decoration. Your photos make me feel like I walked into the church with you. Very effective! I’m also noticing that on this trip you are never far from water – a river or a lake is always close. Thank you for taking me to Norway!

    Comment by Heart To Harp — March 12, 2012 @ 04:23 | Reply

  11. Hello Janet.

    So nice comment. It warmed my heart this sunny Monday morning, thank You. Who knows, maybe someday, I’ll post photos from our trip to Nordkapp, Norway. I put your words into my heart.

    Have a lovely Day!

    Comment by Sartenada — March 12, 2012 @ 08:57 | Reply

  12. I enjoyed your visit to this Norwegian town above that Arctic Circle. The church is absolutely beautiful, but I also like the carvings of the bears.

    Comment by seniorhiker — March 13, 2012 @ 16:54 | Reply

    • Hi George.

      I am happy that You liked my photos showing Kirkenes. Thank You for Your comment.

      Happy Tuesday to You and Betsy.

      Comment by Sartenada — March 13, 2012 @ 17:04 | Reply

  13. that is a very interesting church, i like the artwork. thanks for taking me there🙂

    Comment by giannina — March 15, 2012 @ 02:57 | Reply

    • Hi Giannina.

      Thank You for visiting my blog and leaving Your comment. To see rugs inside churches was to me a big surprise. Rugs are yet popular in homes in Finland, but the church was in Norway.

      Wikipedia gives nice explanation for rug which is in Finnish Ryijy: “Ryijy is a form of Finnish tapestry or cloth rug”.

      Happy Thursday!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 15, 2012 @ 08:06 | Reply

  14. The bear statues are indeed magnificent. My favourite photos of this batch are the altar piece. Such unexpected, beautifully warm colours in an otherwise fresh, clean, quite understated building – it really draw the eye. I love the rugs on the walls too.

    What denomination would these churches north of the Arctic Circle be? The architecture and absence of ornate decoration suggests protestantism to me – in the UK the Roman Catholic churches tend to be more elaborately decorated – but perhaps this is an example of a cultural difference rather than a religious one?

    I used to live in a part of London where there was a Norwegian church, a Swedish church and a Finnish Seaman’s Mission all within a few minutes walk of my flat. I always enjoyed going to the Christmas fairs there and seeing the beautiful Scandinavian crafts.

    Comment by Janice — March 15, 2012 @ 14:02 | Reply

  15. Hi Janice.

    It is Lutheran church as nearly in Finland are also; I found info in Web. I think also that the difference might be more cultural than religious. The last sentence in Your comment is interesting. Finnish Seaman’s Mission in different countries is important for seamen and for others too. I checked from its Web page that there is Sauna. Maybe You should test a real Sauna and on many days there are Ladies hours. Before trying it read my post

    Finnish Sauna.

    In It there is real info about Sauna and we have experiences.🙂 I am sure that few people know really what Sauna is, what to do there and how to behave etc.

    Thank You for Your comment.

    Have a lovely day!

    Comment by Sartenada — March 15, 2012 @ 15:31 | Reply

  16. While the church is similar to the others you’ve shown, its uniqueness is quite apparent, too! The altar is beautiful and oh-so inclusive of the people who comprise the “church,” The rugs are extraordinary as well.

    Wow! The town may be small, but what a church!

    And, yes, Matti. I can’t help but chuckle about your fascination with bears!

    Comment by Deli Lanoux, Ed.D. — April 9, 2012 @ 18:47 | Reply

    • Hello Deli.

      Well, we Finns love bears according to that how many I have found by the roadside; maybe it is due to that, why I love bear statutes. To me it was a big surprise to find them in Kirkenes, Norway. What comes to the church, it was the second time when I visited a church in Norway. First time it was in Nordkapp, Norway. Very nice chapel. What is also interesting to me is to see which kind of churches there are in small places and this one surprised me with its rugs.

      Thank You commenting.

      Comment by Sartenada — April 10, 2012 @ 07:12 | Reply


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