Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

January 8, 2010

Comparing war memorials II / Comparando monumentos a los caídos II / Comparant monuments aux morts II

Part II/II. Parte II/II.

In English:

When photographing churches, it is quite natural to visit on local cemeteries. What is eye striking, are war memorials or as we call them: “Pro Patria” in English “For the Fatherland” statues. Some of them are great, some less great, because some villages are poor. This is quite understandable because total number of deaths was 90 000 and wounded nearly 200 000. This means that in many small villages there were after war nearly young children and old men. Women had to do same work than their decedent husbands and also their own work. But the war is not the only one thing were people died. In 1866–1868 we had great famine. During those years eight percent of total number of our population died. In numbers that is 115707 persons. Also in 1695—1697 we had bigger famine and then 150000 died. That number was about one third about the whole population.

En español:

Al fotografiar iglesias, es bastante natural visitar en cementerios locales. Lo que salta a la vista son monumentos a los caídos o como nosotros los llamamos: “Pro Patria” o en español “Por la Patria” estatuas. Algunos de ellos son espectaculares algunos no lo estan, porque algunos pueblos son pobres. Esto es bastante entendible porque el número de total de muertes fue 90 000 e hirió casi 200 000. Esto significa que en muchas pequeñas aldeas allí habían después de guerrea solamente niños y a ancianos casi jóvenes. Las mujeres tuvieron que hacer mismo trabajo que sus maridos difuntos y además sus propio trabajo. Pero la guerra no es el cosa único dónde fue personas muertas. En 1866–1868 tuvimos el gran hambre. Durante esos años ocho por ciento del número total de nuestra población moría. En los números eso hace 115707 personas. También en 1695—1697 tuvimos más gran hambre y entonces 150000 morían. Ese número estuvo acerca de la tercera parte acerca de la población entera.

En francais:

En photographiant des églises, c’est tout à fait naturel pour visiter les cimetières locaux. Ce qui frappe l’oeil sont des monuments aux morts ou comme nous les appelons : “Pro Patria” ou en français “Pour la patrie” statues. Certains d’elles sont grandes, quelques-unes moins grandes, parce que certains villages sont pauvres. Ceci est tout à fait compréhensible parce que le nombre total de morts était 90 000 et a blessé presque 200 000. Ceci signifie que dans beaucoup de villages petits il y avait après la guerre presque jeunes enfants et les vieil hommes. Les femmes ont dû faire le même travail que leurs défunts maris et de plus leur propre travail. Mais la guerre n’est pas le seul chose quand des gens mouraient. Dans 1866–1868 nous avons eu la grande famine. Pendant ces ans huit pourcent de nombre total de notre population mourait. Dans les nombres c’est 115707 personnes. Aussi dans 1695—1697 nous avons eu la plus grande famine et alors 150000 mouraient. Ce nombre était d’un tiers de la population entière.

Em Português:

Ao fotografar igrejas, é bastante natural para visitar em cemitérios locais. O que é surpreendente olho, são memoriais de guerra ou como lhes chamamos: “Pro Patria” e em portugues “pela pátria” estátuas. Alguns deles são espetaculares alguns não são, porque algumas pessoas são pobres também igrejas. Isto é bastante compreensível, porque o número total de mortes foi de 90 000 e feriu cerca de 200 000. Isto significa que, em muitas pequenas aldeias houve depois da guerra quase crianças jovens e velhos. As mulheres tinham que fazer mesmo trabalho do que seus maridos falecido e também o seu próprio trabalho. Mas a guerra não é a única coisa que eram pessoas morreram. Em 1866-1868, tivemos grande fome. Durante esses anos, oito por cento do número total de nossa população morreu. Em números que é 115.707 pessoas. Também em 1695-1697 tivemos fome maior e, em seguida, 150 mil morreram. Esse número foi de cerca de um terço sobre toda a população.

Lieksa

Lieksa

Mietoinen

Mietoinen

Mynämäki

Mynämäki

Nivala

Nivala

Nousiainen

Nousiainen

Paimio

Paimio

Perniö

Perniö

Pertunmaa

Pertunmaa

Pihtipudas

Pihtipudas

Pyhäranta

Pyhäranta

Rääkkylä

Rääkkylä

Rantasalmi

Rantasalmi

Rantsila

Rantsila

Riihimäki

Riihimäki

Säkylä

Säkylä

Salla

Salla

Salla (again)

Salla (again)

Salo (Uskela)

Salo (Uskela)

Sauvo

Sauvo

Savitaipale

Savitaipale

Simo1

Simo1

Simo2

Simo2

Soini

Soini

Tiistenjoki

Tiistenjoki

Tohmajärvi

Tohmajärvi

Toholampi

Toholampi

Ylivieska

Ylivieska

Äänekoski

Äänekoski

Comparing war memorials I / Comparando monumentos a los caídos I / Comparant monuments aux morts I

24 Comments »

  1. AMAZING IMAGES!!!

    Comment by Sam — January 9, 2010 @ 10:01 | Reply

    • Hi Sam.

      Thank You for Your visit and leaving Your comment here.

      Happy Weekend!

      Comment by sartenada — January 9, 2010 @ 10:44 | Reply

  2. Good morning, Matti
    I looked at the site and tried to imagine what it was during the war. Thank God, I have not yet experienced it. It must have been terrible. I know it well from the stories my parents and other older people. The monuments should be a memorial to ensure that it does not happen again. I want peace for the entire world and that all people will soon get better. You have reached this page presented in color, of course, and again, very exemplary. I am very glad that I could look at it. I continue to try to regularly visit your blog. I wish you and Anya all the best for your health and daily ways. Thank you for your kind comments on my web page. Here it is snowing heavily since this morning. Drive carefully. Dear greetings Christel

    Comment by Christel — January 9, 2010 @ 13:20 | Reply

    • Hello Christel.

      Thank You visiting here. My father-in-law is 92 years old and every time when visiting him we “must” listen to war stories. They differs very much from those which are presented in movies, but it is natural, because they are based on real experiences. He is half death, because in war he was wounded by grenade into one ear and one eye. He has still very tiny shrapnels in his other eye. So when talking with him, we must shout. But what is odd, that he can still live in his own detached house and taking care of housekeeping, shopping etc.

      Thank You for Your comment.

      Comment by sartenada — January 9, 2010 @ 16:08 | Reply

  3. You capture your subjects so well in your photots. Your photos stand alone, each a story within itself. I have never seen grave stones such as these.

    Comment by Preston Surface — January 11, 2010 @ 03:46 | Reply

    • Thank You Preston.

      Your nice, warm words encourage me to continue to photograph next summer also these statues.

      Comment by sartenada — January 11, 2010 @ 07:22 | Reply

  4. I am more than impressed I am humbled! WOW!

    You need to join our Sunday Stills little group…you would have fun. I have added you to my Rss feeds!

    Linda
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

    Comment by dayphoto — March 8, 2011 @ 22:39 | Reply

    • Hi Linda.

      It was so nice to read, that You seemingly liked them. Thank You very much commenting.

      I do not know what Sunday Stills are. I am posting mainly on Fridays, because it fits to me best.

      Happy Wednesday!

      Comment by sartenada — March 9, 2011 @ 09:37 | Reply

  5. Oh, Matti, how devastating that your homeland lost so many during the war! During the famines, too!

    The monuments you’ve shown depict much sadness but much fortitude as well. There’s an inner strength in your people’s resilience.

    Your countrymen, women, and children are very brave indeed!

    Comment by Deli Lanoux, Ed.D. — February 20, 2012 @ 00:13 | Reply

    • Hello Deli.

      Thank You commenting this post of mine. I see that You have had Your heart with You when answering! I appreciate it highly.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — February 20, 2012 @ 08:21 | Reply

  6. these are such moving statues! so modern somehow, and not just honoring soldiers, but also “normal” people. they are very effective.

    i look forward to reading more of your blog!

    Comment by maratinage — September 7, 2012 @ 20:15 | Reply

    • Hi Maratinage.

      I am glad that You checked these statues and did understand how “heart breaking” some of them are. Thank You.

      Happy week-end!

      Comment by Sartenada — September 8, 2012 @ 08:09 | Reply

  7. Beautiful memorials, lots of unique designs that convey a lot of emotion (I like the two men kneeling in particular). Lovely series of photos.

    NZ sent men to both World Wars and every town here has a memorial, usually with the names of local men who died. While typically not as ‘creative’ as the ones in your posts, the memorials have a quiet grace about them and I’m thinking about a very long term project to progressively capture them all. That would be a big undertaking!

    Comment by hayley — February 17, 2013 @ 20:04 | Reply

    • Hi Hayley.

      Thank you for your kind comment. When visiting graveyards here one notices immediately that memorials and tomb stones have a place of honor nearby churches and the tombs are kept well by parishes.

      I love art and on cemeteries there are plenty of art. In Helsinki on its biggest cemetery last year’s summer we did find many angel statues. I said to my wife that someday we have to spend a whole day there photographing art on cemetery.

      I am happy that You have there also memorials and thus honor those who gave their lives in the war.

      Have a great day.

      Comment by Sartenada — February 18, 2013 @ 08:21 | Reply

  8. Thank you for sending the link to your images of war memorials. Cemeteries are fascinating places filled with so many that died protecting their nation. It truly is a humbling experience to see first hand.

    Comment by 12thsonoflama — May 22, 2013 @ 05:53 | Reply

    • Hi 12thsonoflama.

      Thank You. I feel happy that You did see my post. Cemeteries are also full with art and history. I got my inspiration to visit cemeteries in Paris when visiting there the cemetery of Père-Lachaise. I highly recommend!

      Have a great day!

      Comment by Sartenada — May 22, 2013 @ 07:12 | Reply

  9. Dear Sartenada! … Thanks for providing historical information about your beautiful country…
    These war memorials are almost sublime… One can feel the pain, the lost but overall the respect towards those who passed away during belic episodes. Really touching . I shall share it on Twitter later today when I sign up! … all my best wishes to you. Aquileana⭐

    Comment by Aquileana — April 2, 2015 @ 12:45 | Reply

  10. Beautiful pictures!

    Comment by warnerserenam — August 20, 2015 @ 13:03 | Reply

    • Hi warnerserenam.

      How nice to know that You love it. Thnk You for your comment.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 20, 2015 @ 13:51 | Reply

  11. These statues are great , really! They tell a lot about pain and sorrow ; our poor soldiers deserve this reminder a and our respect!
    Very good photos!

    Comment by 76sanfermo — August 20, 2015 @ 15:17 | Reply

    • Chiao Anna.

      Thank you. In addition to these statues every solder has own tombstone with flowers. All the tombs are well-kept because it is a matter of honor, even in the smallest and poorest village.

      Have a great day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 21, 2015 @ 10:53 | Reply

  12. Hello can you tell me the name oft the memorial for this image? https://sartenada.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/salla16_14052008.jpg

    Kittos

    Comment by Edward Casas — March 16, 2016 @ 02:58 | Reply

    • Hi Edward.

      I replied to You by mail.

      Have a great day!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 16, 2016 @ 13:51 | Reply


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