Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

April 6, 2010

Skillful captain / Capitán hábil / Adroit capitaine

In English:

Look at how skillful is the captain of ship when he is passing in a narrow canal. There is not so much place on both sides of ship. The canal of Taipale is in Varkaus connecting two lakes at different levels. I had also possibility to visit the control tower of canal and to take photos from there.

There are two Canals of Taipale, the old one and the new one. I start my photos with four photos from old canal.

En español:

Mira cuán hábil es el capitán del buque cuando está pasando en un canal estrecho. No hay mucho espacio en ambos lados de la nave. El canal de Taipale está en Varkaus haciendo la conexión entre dos lagos en diferentes niveles. También había la posibilidad de visitar la torre de control del canal y de tomar fotos desde allí.

Hay dos canales de Taipale, el viejo y el nuevo. Empiezo mis fotos con cuatro fotos del viejo canal.

En francais:

Regardez comment adroit est le capitaine du navire au moment où il se passe dans un canal étroit. Il n’y a pas tant de place sur les deux côtés du navire. Le canal de Taipale est à Varkaus reliant deux lacs à différents niveaux. J’avais aussi la possibilité de visiter la tour de contrôle du canal et de prendre des photos à partir de là.

Il existe deux canaux de Taipale, l’ancien et le nouveau. Je commence mes photos avec quatre photos du vieux canal.

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

Ship passing in Tapale canal

21 Comments »

  1. Hello Matti,
    De retour de vacances ?
    Le vieux canal a bien-sûr beaucoup de charme, et ce passage d’écluse des temps modernes est très spectaculaire.
    J’aime les images en gros plan du bateau lorsqu’il passe sous la tour de contrôle.
    Bonne journée.

    Comment by Marion B. — April 6, 2010 @ 08:33 | Reply

    • Bonjour Marion.

      Oui, j’suis revenu depuis d’une semaine. Je me rejoins que t’as plu mes photos. J’admire beaucoup ce capitaine.

      Bonne journée á toi aussi.

      Comment by sartenada — April 6, 2010 @ 11:20 | Reply

  2. Thank you for posting this series. It’s amazing how little room that ship has in the canal! What skill the captain must have.

    Comment by montucky — April 6, 2010 @ 16:44 | Reply

    • Hi. Yes, You are so right. This canal is in the town (Varkaus) where I spent twelve years when I was young.

      Comment by sartenada — April 6, 2010 @ 16:56 | Reply

  3. I think that boat was measured and a canal built just the right size for it. It certainly won’t take anything much larger!

    Comment by jackiequeen — April 6, 2010 @ 19:20 | Reply

    • Hello Jackie.

      Of course the boat is measured to pass in this canal, but anyway the captain is skilled. The new canal of Taipale was built in already 1867–1871 and last modification was made in 1962–1967. So when looking at these numbers one might think when the old canal was built. It was built in 1835–1840. When it came too small, then the new one was built.

      The new canal has history and the most interesting is that during 1866–1868 in Finland we had great years of famine. This means that a great number of people died of famine (115 707 persons) and the state organized work for men to build this canal. Although total number of workers of this canal who died is 281! They have special memorial in Varkaus.

      Comment by sartenada — April 7, 2010 @ 06:51 | Reply

  4. Good evening, Matti,
    the complete recordings are very interesting and color, clear, and of course in the reproduction. In the first few pictures, saw the water very brown. Then it seems to become clearer. It is amazing how the captain, the ship through the narrow channel controls. Just as I have known, monitors are on the control tower. I think that because a better security is ensured, to steer the ship. I am grateful that I was allowed to visit your blog and for your nice comment. You and Anja, I wish you well and health to your daily routes. Dear greetings Christel

    Comment by Christel — April 6, 2010 @ 22:39 | Reply

    • Guten morgen, Christel.

      The brown water is coming from nearby paper and plywood mills. They need logs, a plenty of logs. Still today log rafts pass also thru this canal. To float logs is much cheaper than to tranport them on roads.

      Comment by sartenada — April 7, 2010 @ 06:56 | Reply

  5. Wow, that is impressive! Must have been a sight to watch. I love the photos of the old canal, too, though I can’t imagine a boat getting up the old one.

    Comment by kateri — April 7, 2010 @ 02:18 | Reply

    • Hello Kateri.

      As I told earlier to Jackie, the old canal is not in use. Actually there is the canal museum beside of old canal.

      Comment by sartenada — April 7, 2010 @ 06:58 | Reply

  6. Wow! What gorgeous shots! I enjoyed the journey with each capture. That mighty ship didn’t have very much room on each side, and indeed, skillful captain. The old canal is beautiful and I love the perspective you shot from. That must have been something watching and photographing the ship going through the canal. Wonderful photos and post.

    Comment by Anna Surface — April 7, 2010 @ 22:30 | Reply

    • Thank You Anna for Your nice comment. It was so very interesting to read that You liked the old canal also. Originally I thought not to show them, but when making the post I decided to publish them just to compare with the new one.

      Comment by sartenada — April 8, 2010 @ 06:06 | Reply

  7. I bet it was exciting taking these shots. The Captain navigated perfectly through such a narrow passage. You caught some really good angles making them real interesting.

    Comment by Preston — April 8, 2010 @ 04:12 | Reply

    • Hello Preston. I was very happy when I had possibility to visit the control tower and then to take photos from “different” angle than normally.

      Comment by sartenada — April 8, 2010 @ 06:08 | Reply

  8. I have not visited for a while. Very nice part of the world that you live in. This set of photos is amazing indeed – seeing the ship pass through the narrow canal! You might like to know a replica of a 9th Century Arab dhow, the Jewel of Muscat, has arrived in Singapore after a four month voyage from Muscat using traditional navigational methods. She is a gift from Oman to Singapore. I have some pictures of her arrival at http://thelongnwindingroad.wordpress.com/2010/07/03/singapore-welcomes-the-jewel/.

    Comment by The wondering wanderer — July 5, 2010 @ 03:46 | Reply

    • Hello the wondering wanderer.

      So nice to read that You liked my photos.

      You are lucky when You can see such kind of sailing ships visiting in Your lovely country.

      Regards.

      Comment by sartenada — July 7, 2010 @ 13:49 | Reply

  9. I enjoyed seeing both the old canal and the new one. Great series of photographs.

    Comment by Deb Platt — March 29, 2013 @ 05:10 | Reply

    • Hello Deb.

      Your comment concerning this post made me very happy. I live in my younghood thirteen years neaby the town where these canals are, so they are dear to me. Thank You.

      Happy Easter!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 29, 2013 @ 12:23 | Reply

  10. I’m ‘exploring’ Finland from London using your site. I’m learning lots. Just ‘visited’ Tapale Canal and watched your ship pass through the lock. It’s like being in that control tower – great. I can even see the Canal on Bing maps at this link here – . http://binged.it/1BMXQpl
    Even more clear when I rotate the map. And now I’ve found a lot more water management engineering nearby just a short ‘walk’ north. Good to ‘explore’ the area. Thanks for your help.

    Comment by johnsworldview — September 17, 2014 @ 20:48 | Reply

    • Hi John.

      Nice comment. Thank You. Well, my country is finally quite unknown and when being retired I started to present it thru my photos which tell story in every post.

      More info:

      About me.

      Happy blogging Sir.

      Comment by Sartenada — September 18, 2014 @ 07:35 | Reply


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