Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

August 2, 2016

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

In English:

In Mikkeli the old vicarage (Kenkävero) offers every summer for volunteers to try out the traditional haymaking. I appreciate this very much, because the youth has no idea about it. Haymaking was in villages a big happening. Both women and men participated in it. Workdays were long and they started early in the morning.

Haymaking was teamwork and traditionally hay was made by hand, using a scythe, hayfork and rake.

In Finland generally haymaking was held in the second half of July or beginning of August. In Finland July is called in Finnish: “heinäkuu” which means literally translated hay month. In Finnish we have also the phrase: “Helppoa kuin heinänteko” which literally translated is “Easy as haymaking”, but which means It’s a piece of cake or It’s easy as pie or Very easy or quite modern version It’s not rocket science.

En español:

En Mikkeli la antigua vicaría (Kenkävero) ofrece cada verano para los voluntarios para probar como es henificación tradicional. Aprecio esto mucho, porque la juventud no tiene ni idea de ello. Henificación era en las pueblos un gran acontecimiento.. Tanto las mujeres como los hombres participaron en ella. Días de trabajo eran largas y comenzaron temprano en la mañana.

Henificación era el trabajo en equipo y tradicionalmente heno fue hecha a mano, usando una guadaña, horca y el rastrillo.

En Finlandia, por lo general la henificación se llevó a cabo en la segunda quincena de julio o en los principios de agosto..En Finlandia julio se llama en finés: “heinäkuu” que significa literalmente traducido el mes de heno. En Finlandia tenemos también la frase: “Helppoa kuin heinänteko”, que traducido literalmente es “Fácil como la henificación”.

En francais:

Á Mikkeli l’ancien presbytère (Kenkavero) offre chaque été pour des volontaires comment c’est á faire le fenaison traditionnelle. Je l’apprécie beaucoup, parce que la jeunesse n’a pas d’idée à ce sujet. Fenaison était dans les villages un grand événement. Les femmes et les hommes ont participé. Les journées de travail étaient longues et ils ont commencés tôt le matin. Fenaison était le travail d’équipe et traditionnellement foin a été fait à la main, en utilisant un faux, fourche à foin et le râteau.

En Finlande généralement fenaison a eu lieu dans la seconde moitié de juillet ou début d’août. En Finlande, Juillet est appelé en finnois: “heinäkuu” qui signifie littéralement traduit mois de foin. En finnois, nous avons aussi la phrase: “Helppoa kuin heinänteko” qui traduit littéralement est “simple comme la fenaison”.

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking  / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

Haymaking / Henificación / Fenaison / Fenação

More traditions / Más tradiciones / Plus de traditions / Mais tradições

Traditional carpet washing / Lavando alfombras tradicionalmente / Lavage de tapis traditionnellement.

Himmeli.

Himmeli how to make it.

Bobbin Lace.

Herring Fair / Mercados de arenque / Marchés de hareng.

Finnish national instrument Kantele.

Finnish Sauna.

Finnish summer cottage.

One week on vacation cottage.

Christmas Markets.

Midsummer cruise.

Helsinki illumination in winter.

60 Comments »

  1. The haymaking seems to be fun. I hope that haymaking will continue in the future.

    Comment by wakasahs15th — August 2, 2016 @ 07:33 | Reply

    • Hello Wakasahs15th.

      Thank You. Yes, it is / was fun teamwork. Nowadays machines do everything and people are not connected to each other, except by phones.

      Have a nice evening.

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 08:17 | Reply

  2. What a lovely tradition to continue with and to give people the opportunity to experience ancient crafts that otherwise might become forgotten with mechanisation. Thank you for telling us about it and for the excellent photographs.

    Comment by Little Miss Traveller — August 2, 2016 @ 09:05 | Reply

    • Hi Little Miss Traveller.

      This kind of event is also journey back in time.🙂 Sometimes it is worth to visit small towns and to find about what there happens. Thank You for Your kind comment.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 09:48 | Reply

  3. What a nice event🙂 I really like that there is a chance for people today to somewhat experience what old life was like in the farms.

    Comment by lostinprettyeurope — August 2, 2016 @ 09:13 | Reply

    • Hello Lostinprettyeurope.

      i appreciate Your words. It seems easy, but we can think that it presented its own time gym also.🙂 Thank You.

      Hava a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 09:52 | Reply

  4. Wonderful! When I was growing up on our farm, we used to make hay in the same way, only it was cut with a tractor and mower. The rest of it was done in the old fashioned way because we couldn’t afford the machinery necessary! I used to love it though, great fun in the summer sun!

    Comment by chrissiedixie — August 2, 2016 @ 09:45 | Reply

    • Hello Chrissie.

      How nice to read Your comment. So, You have Yourself experiened its fun under summer fun.🙂

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 09:57 | Reply

  5. Oh, boy. I’d be happy to just record the activity. It looks like hard work.

    I remember the grain being cut by a horse drawn machine that produces a sheaf of grain. Then, my brothers set 5 or 6 of these into a stook. Later the dried sheaves were loaded and taken to a threshing machine. It was so labor intensive and subject to the vagaries of the weather.

    Comment by Yvonne — August 2, 2016 @ 10:18 | Reply

    • Hello Yvonne.

      You have lovely memories, I love them. Thank You commenting so nicely.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 11:52 | Reply

  6. I’m enchanted by this post!
    Such a hard task carried out by volunteers , brings to mind what really was ,working in rural villages In the past….
    Fascinating pics, too!

    Comment by 76sanfermo — August 2, 2016 @ 10:28 | Reply

    • Ciao Anna.

      You are right Anna. I am very glad that You loved this post and its photos. Thank You.

      Have a lovely day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 12:01 | Reply

  7. Love it; hard work and team work in the nature, I’m sure my kids would love to have a go at it too. Thanks for sharing it🙂

    Comment by Marina — August 2, 2016 @ 10:43 | Reply

    • Hi Marina.

      This is very different from our modern day, so trip to the past would be nice for them portably.🙂

      Have a great day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 12:21 | Reply

  8. Very good. It is nice to learn about Finland from your perspective. Thank you.

    Comment by philipdenotto — August 2, 2016 @ 12:36 | Reply

    • Hello Philip.

      Thank You commenting and liking my post. Photo blogs with themes are best when searching inside information about some country.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 12:41 | Reply

  9. Wonderful photos of this process! They make me think of all the paintings done by Impressionist painters of haystacks like these.

    Comment by KerryCan — August 2, 2016 @ 12:41 | Reply

    • Hi Kerry.

      Yes indeed – like paintings. I am glad that You left Your comment and loved photos.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 12:59 | Reply

  10. A great way to spend the day with community people! Did the stacked hay stay in the field until needed or was it later stacked in a barn? I’ve help stacked square bales in a barn… Helps to make a healthy appetite!🙂

    Comment by Deb — August 2, 2016 @ 12:44 | Reply

    • Hi Deb.

      The stacked hay was later stacked in a barn. When a kid I participated in stacking them in barn – it was cool.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 12:54 | Reply

  11. la fenaison est une tradition à conserver, elle existe encore en montagne dans les Pyrénées en France, là où les machines ne peuvent être utilisées

    Comment by Bernieshoot — August 2, 2016 @ 13:02 | Reply

    • Bonjour Bernard.

      Quel plaisir à lire que les traditions vivent encore en France! Je me réjouis Merci beaucoup.

      Bonne journée à vous.!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 13:10 | Reply

  12. Sounds so interesting. Is heymaking for dairy farming? In my area Hokkaido, dairy farmers dry pasture grass and store for winter. I submitted this picture in past page in July 31. I’d so appreciated if you could see it.

    Comment by superkamui — August 2, 2016 @ 13:05 | Reply

    • Hello Watayuki.

      In Finland, both cows and horses must eat in winter, dried hay. Thank You for Your comment and question. I will check Your photo. Yes, I replied to You also in Your post.

      こんばんは.

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 13:41 | Reply

  13. Hello.
    I’m can people of teamwork in the month of dried grass. I think that it is great work.

    Comment by saganhama — August 2, 2016 @ 13:25 | Reply

    • Hello Saganhama.

      I am glad that You loved my post and its photos. Thank You very much commenting.

      こんばんは.

      Comment by Sartenada — August 3, 2016 @ 07:47 | Reply

  14. What a fun event! I must admit, I know nothing about haymaking, maybe I should take park one day😀

    Comment by Suvi — August 2, 2016 @ 13:42 | Reply

    • Hello Suvi.

      Thank You. Great fun and a social event at same time.🙂

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 2, 2016 @ 13:48 | Reply

  15. Thanks for sharing all these pictures that show hay making still in the old fashioned way! In times of huge and modern hay turning machines or combine harvesters with kind of a binder attachment, it’s rather exciting to see people doing it manually, according to old traditions and in a group! What an interesting day for all the volunteers! – Michèle

    Comment by ladyfromhamburg — August 2, 2016 @ 15:43 | Reply

    • Hello Michèle.

      “Back to the past” can be great experience for many people who participated in this happening.🙂 I appreciate old traditions very much. Thank You for Your kind comment.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 3, 2016 @ 07:54 | Reply

  16. Très belles photos de la coupe du foin et de son séchage sur un pieu . C ‘ est tout à fait nostalgique et c’est aussi une leçon d ‘histoire .
    j’ ai connu aussi l’ agriculture ancienne . Il fallait du monde dans les champs pour la moisson et la fenaison. Maintenant tout est devenu industriel !
    Amitié
    Michel

    Comment by fauquetmichel — August 2, 2016 @ 15:52 | Reply

    • Bonjour Michel.

      Tes visites sur mon blog sont toujours un plaisir pour moi. J’ai vécu 12 ans dans ma jeunesse sur la campagne et c’est ça pourquoi j’aime la fenaison. Je suis heureux que vous aviez également un contact avec l’agriculture et donc vous l’appréciez. Merci beaucoup. Amitié Matti.

      Bonne journée.

      Comment by Sartenada — August 3, 2016 @ 12:32 | Reply

  17. I think it’s wonderful that this traditional way of making hay is being preserved. Your photos are fantastic. I was especially interested in the way the hay is stacked. The field of stacked hay is beautiful.

    Comment by seniorhiker — August 2, 2016 @ 16:15 | Reply

    • Hi Geaorge.

      This is how they will be dry before bringing them to hay barn. Transverse baton helps air to pass, that the hay will not be mold. If packed too tight, it could be possible. Thank You for Your kind comment.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 3, 2016 @ 13:13 | Reply

  18. It looks so fun.
    Last photo is very beautiful.
    I see cute creatures walking.

    Comment by 洋子 — August 2, 2016 @ 17:39 | Reply

    • Hello August.

      Thank You for Your kind comment. We returned there in the evening to see them all.

      すばらしい日を過してください。

      Comment by Sartenada — August 3, 2016 @ 13:42 | Reply

  19. What great tradition for all. Looks fun and it is really helpful! Lovely pictures!

    Comment by utesmile — August 2, 2016 @ 18:29 | Reply

    • Hello Ute.

      How nice that You loved my post and loved my photos. Thank You.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 3, 2016 @ 13:44 | Reply

  20. Bonsoir Matti
    C’est un plaisir de redécouvrir ces vieux métiers agricoles,
    tes photos sont superbes. Belle soirée à toi!
    Hervé

    Comment by vever02 — August 2, 2016 @ 18:48 | Reply

    • Bonjour Hervé.

      Je vous remercie vivement pour votre si gentil commentaire. Je suis heureux que vous avez aimé mes photos.

      Bonne journée à vous.

      Comment by Sartenada — August 4, 2016 @ 07:26 | Reply

  21. A wonderful tradition and lovely to see it being preserved. As always your photos take me right there. A lovely sunny day!

    Comment by Sue Slaght — August 2, 2016 @ 19:15 | Reply

    • Hello Sue.

      How nice to rea that You loved this post and its photos. To me it is important that people stick to traditions, because young generation start to forget how life was in the past.

      Thank You.

      Comment by Sartenada — August 4, 2016 @ 07:36 | Reply

  22. Great documentation – thanks for sharing. Now my Finnish cousin dairy farmers are mechanized, but they must have also done it this way back a few generations. We saw a few fields like that last year when we went back to “the old country” for a family reunion.

    Comment by Rich Mattson — August 2, 2016 @ 20:10 | Reply

    • Hello Rich.

      Thank You leaving Your kind comment. I am glad that You loved my photos.

      Have a great day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 4, 2016 @ 07:47 | Reply

  23. I love reading your blog. It’s a wonderful cultural education. I especially loved the carpet-washing post you posted previously.

    Comment by Word Floe — August 2, 2016 @ 22:14 | Reply

    • Hello Word Floe.

      Thank You for Your praising comment. Your words touch my heart. Traditional carpet washing is one post, which I love very much.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 4, 2016 @ 07:50 | Reply

  24. How enjoyable to see this! When I was kid I used a scythe a little, just to get used to it, but I used a hayfork a lot to put cut and raked hay onto a trailer to take to the barn. We call it a “pitchfork” here.

    Comment by montucky — August 3, 2016 @ 00:32 | Reply

    • Hi Terry.

      Very nice that You have used scythe! We had small country place where we used it twice a year. My wife used scythe and I mowed lawn which took me two / three hour. Thank You for Your kind comment.

      Have a great day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 4, 2016 @ 10:10 | Reply

  25. Interesting!
    it is hard work but after that all of you enjoy good beer,right?

    Comment by kanaconnie — August 4, 2016 @ 06:50 | Reply

    • Hello Connie.

      Hard work is also enjoyable, I think.🙂 Thank You commenting and loving my post.

      すばらしい日を過してください。

      Comment by Sartenada — August 4, 2016 @ 10:14 | Reply

  26. Last photo is my favorite!
    artistic and peaceful!

    Comment by キース — August 7, 2016 @ 07:46 | Reply

    • Hi Keith.

      Thank you for Your kind words. I am glad that You loved my photos.

      すばらしい日を過してください。

      Comment by Sartenada — August 7, 2016 @ 10:24 | Reply

  27. Very interesting to see Matti, and a lovely tradition to keep going. The raised poles onto which the hay is loaded reminds me of something I saw in a historic village in Ireland. There, I think the heavy rainfall made this necessary.

    Comment by Janice / Dancing with Sunflowersj — August 8, 2016 @ 13:50 | Reply

    • Hello Janice.

      I am glad that You have touch traditions and love them. Thank You for Your kind comment.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 9, 2016 @ 10:14 | Reply

  28. Gracias for illustrating the saying, “you’ve got to make hay while the sun shines.” 😉

    Comment by spixl — August 8, 2016 @ 15:13 | Reply

    • Hi Spixl.

      Oh, wonderful expression. I love it. Thank You.

      ¡Que tengas un muy buen día!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 9, 2016 @ 10:24 | Reply

  29. Terrific post, Sartenada. I very much enjoyed seeing the different steps taken to drying the hay, and your photos here are great. I love the last one especially, the final result. I have never seen this kind of haymaking.

    Comment by Jet Eliot — August 11, 2016 @ 01:18 | Reply

    • Hello Jet Elliot.

      I am speechless when reading Your praising comment. Thank You very much.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 11, 2016 @ 07:25 | Reply

  30. Just been exploring your blog and love all the clear photos and insight into Finnish life. You are certainly a true linguist !

    Comment by navasolanature — August 23, 2016 @ 17:42 | Reply

    • Hello Navasolanature.

      Thank you liking so many my posts. Well, I am not linguist, I love languages and when translating, I have to use in many cases dictionaries, examine the various grammatical forms of verbs, adjectives, gender of words etc. All this requires time, but it is interesting to find differences between different languages.

      Languages offer a good knowledge of culture, history, traditions and geography.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — August 24, 2016 @ 07:25 | Reply


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