Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

April 8, 2011

Comparing bell towers IV / Comparando campanarios IV / Comparant Clochers IV

In English:

36 beautiful bell towers.

When looking at my photos, keep in mind that a majority of bell towers are situated at countryside far away from highways. Time range for my photos is covering from 2004 to 2010. This means that I have been using Panasonic Lumix DMC FX7 from 2004 (5.0 Mega Pixel digital Camera), Panasonic Lumix DMC LX-1 from 2006 (8.0 Mega Pixel digital Camera) and Nikon D300 from 2008 (12.3 Mega Pixel digital Camera). So this means the difference of quality of my photos.

En español:

36 hermosas campanarios.

Al mirar mis fotos, tenga en cuenta que la mayoría de los campanarios se encuentran en zonas rurales muy lejos de las carreteras grandes. Sacaba mis photos entre 2004 y 2010. Esto significa que he estado usando Panasonic Lumix DMC FX7 del año 2004 (cámara digital 5.0 megapíxeles), Panasonic Lumix DMC LX-1 del año 2006 (cámara digital 8.3 megapíxeles)y Nikon D300 del año 2008 (cámara digital 12.3 megapíxeles). Así, esto significa la diferencia de calidad de mis fotos.

En francais:

36 beaux Clochers.

Lorsque l’on regarde mes photos, gardez à l’esprit que la majorité des clochers sont situés à la campagne loin des grandes autoroutes. Prenais mes photos entre 2004 et 2010. Cela signifie que J’ai utilisé Panasonic Lumix DMC FX7 à partir de 2004 (appareil photo numérique 5.0 Mégapixels), Panasonic Lumix DMC LX-1 à partir de 2006 (appareil photo numérique 8.0 Mégapixels) et Nikon D300 à partir de 2008 (appareil photo numérique 12.3 Mégapixels). Donc, cela signifie la différence de qualité de mes photos.

Iisalmi church of Kustaa Aadolf

Iisalmi church of Kustaa Aadolf

Maaninka

Maaninka

Mäntyharju

Mäntyharju

Pello

Pello

Pihtipudas

Pihtipudas

Purmo

Purmo

Pyhäjärvi

Pyhäjärvi

Rantsila

Rantsila

Rautalampi

Rautalampi

Reposaari

Reposaari

Revonlahti

Revonlahti

Ristiina

Ristiina

Ruovesi

Ruovesi

Sääksmäki

Sääksmäki

Salla

Salla

Sammatti

Sammatti

Särkisalo

Särkisalo

Sauvo

Sauvo

Savitaipale

Savitaipale

Simo

Simo

Sipoo old church

Sipoo old church

Siuntio

Siuntio

Soini

Soini

Sulkava

Sulkava

Suomussalmi

Suomussalmi

Sysmä

Sysmä

Taipalsaari

Taipalsaari

Tohmajärvi

Tohmajärvi

Tuusula

Tuusula

Ullava

Ullava

Ulvila

Ulvila

Uukuniemi

Uukuniemi

Uurainen

Uurainen

Vähäkyrö

Vähäkyrö

Värtsilä

Värtsilä

Västanfjärd

Västanfjärd

Compare Belltowers I / Comparando campanarios I / Comparant Clochers I

Compare Belltowers II / Comparando campanarios II / Comparant Clochers II

Compare Belltowers III / Comparando campanarios III / Comparant Clochers III

29 Comments »

  1. Amazing! All different shapes and styles, colours, heights and materials, but all beautiful in their own right.
    In the “Salla” photo it is like the rest of the building sank into the ground, leaving only the spire, but it’s still stunning, ….Captivating, ….Beautiful.
    I was going to try and pick out a favourite, but to be honest, when you find yourself counting more than 15 “favourites” it’s clear that you actually have no favourites at all.
    The roof shapes and details are stunning, I could gaze for hours, what a wonderful tour! Thanks!

    Comment by kiwidutch — April 8, 2011 @ 08:12 | Reply

    • Good morning Kiwidutch.

      Thank You. I remember very well that one of Salla. It was looking so different in our eyes. On the home page of Salla, they say: “in the Middle of Nowhere”. So it might be when looking at that photo. Salla is small place with 4155 inhabitants and it is situated about 50 kilometers / 32 miles to the North of Polar Circle and very near to the Russian border.

      I am so glad that You found these interesting. When driving around in my country then in the smallest village one can find some glad and positive surprise as these bell towers present in my country.

      Happy Friday!

      Comment by sartenada — April 8, 2011 @ 08:33 | Reply

  2. After 10 weeks of travelling “down under” full of great experiences and adventures – it is also good to be back home, doing all the things I “normally” do….
    Like reading blogs! (And writing my own…)
    And you are still able to create these impressive posts about your lovely country!
    Interesting post!

    Comment by truels — April 8, 2011 @ 14:02 | Reply

    • Hi Truels.

      Welcome back! Thank You commenting and visiting my blog. Well, I try to present and to find some usual and unusual things. I love our separated bell towers. Also it is interesting to see on “deepest” countryside that there is life and “old culture” still remains.

      Happy week-end!

      Comment by sartenada — April 8, 2011 @ 14:15 | Reply

  3. What a wonderful collection of bell towers. While a couple of them are very sleek and modern-looking, I like the older style, especially the wooden ones. But all of them are beautiful — you did a great job getting these pictures.

    Comment by seniorhiker — April 8, 2011 @ 16:06 | Reply

    • Hi George.

      Thank You. I find it interesting that there are differences between them and they are not similar everyone. These bell towers are just lighthouses when searching some village and they can be seen from a distance.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by sartenada — April 8, 2011 @ 16:15 | Reply

  4. How wonderful they all are! Each one is unique and beautiful in its own right! I found the one at Mäntyharju most touching. I would love to be able to see them and listen to the tones from each!

    Comment by montucky — April 8, 2011 @ 16:26 | Reply

    • Hello Montucky.

      Thank You commenting. Well, Mäntyharju. I was thinking what photo to present here, because I took many photos from it. Finally I selected this one with view over war memorials. It is showing that how many young men died from this small country side place in WW2. Mäntyharju is very beautiful site with its lake. Maybe You remember my post from beautiful wooden gazebos in Mäntyharju. The place is really worth for visit. Here is the link:

      https://sartenada.wordpress.com/2010/07/09/mantyharju-with-its-gazebos-mantyharju-con-sus-pabellones-mantyharju-avec-ses-pavillons/

      Tones of bell towers are in many cases ear-catching sound.

      Happy Sunday!

      Comment by sartenada — April 10, 2011 @ 12:27 | Reply

      • The bell tower seems so fitting, standing over all those rows of headstones as if to shelter those who are buried there and give them peace. I wish I could walk there and read each inscription and wonder about how they lived and how they died, and tell them in my own way how much their sacrifices have meant to me and to our free world.

        Comment by montucky — April 11, 2011 @ 03:49 | Reply

      • Hi Montucky.

        I am so positively surprised from Your additional comment. What comes to those young men who died, I can say that there are so many untold stories. My late father was in war, but he never talked to me what happened. I only saw huge scar which he bore. My father-in-law talks very much from his experiences.

        Nowadays many sons and daughters of those men, who died in war, want to tell their stories. It was hard for many families to live after the war when the head of family died in war. Very seldom people start to think what does it exactly means. It meant that for example the wife of family had to do men’s work and in addition to her own work. More concretely for example in rural areas it meant, that she had to take care of cows and other animals, to fell trees in the wood, cut off, split, dry, and to carry them for storage that the family had firewood for hard winter. Those fatherless families had to plow the fields and sow the grain in spring, if there was any grain available. In some villages there were only old men, young children and women. Those families had it better if sons were enough big to do the same jobs as their fallen father.

        Well, this all is history now and the number of wounded war veterans is diminishing year by year. In 2010 the number was 52970. They are tough people in spite of everything they had to go through.

        Comment by sartenada — April 11, 2011 @ 12:18 | Reply

  5. Hello Matti,
    Heureusement qu’il ne faut pas élire le plus beau, le choix serait très difficile !! 😛
    Un faible pour les plus colorés, et ce jaune “maïs” m’évoque la pinasse de la plage de Taussat !
    Bises et bon week-end.

    Comment by Marion B. — April 8, 2011 @ 18:38 | Reply

    • Bonjour Marion.

      Merci de m’avoir faite un commentaire. Il y a beaucoup de clochers jaunes comme Maaninka et Pihtipudas. Il est si bon que t’as trouvée la couleur spéciale laquelle te plaît.

      Je te souhaite un bon dimanche.

      Comment by sartenada — April 10, 2011 @ 08:54 | Reply

  6. A lovely set of photos, all with the same theme, but all so different. On my first viewing, I thought I liked Pello best, for its simplicity and black and white colour. But really there are too many to choose from. I prefer the wooden ones to the stone ones. Repossaari is quite unusual looking with the shuttered windows. Hope you have a good week-end.

    Comment by Jackie Queen — April 8, 2011 @ 22:33 | Reply

    • Hi Jackie.

      Thank You. When I started seriously my digital photographing in 2004, I was inspired by my friend Gerardo from Costa Rica, I started by taking photos to him from our churches and bell towers. So photos from our old and wooden churches and bell towers stay very close in my heart yet today, I cannot help it. These slowly opened my eyes to see other things, the beauty of nature etc.

      Bell tower of Pello is situated about at Polar Circle too, but now at the opposite side than Salla, from which Kiwidutch like very much. Pello is on the border of Sweden and the number of habitants is 3980.

      Reposaari, belonging to the city of Pori, is on the western coast on an isthmus and the way to there is worth for seeing.

      Happy Sunday!

      Comment by sartenada — April 10, 2011 @ 09:16 | Reply

  7. These are fabulous. I especially liked Sääksmäki. You know, I got so caught up in the sites that I never even noticed differing quality of photos. You could publish these in a book.

    Comment by Tammy McLeod — April 9, 2011 @ 18:52 | Reply

    • Hello Tammy.

      Thank You Tammy. The bell tower of Sääksmäki to my first photos from churches and belle towers. This I took in 2005 with my first digital camera DMC-FX7 from 2004 and having only 5.0 Mega Pixels. So, from this we can draw the conclusion, that the number of Pixels is not “blissful-making” things when photographing. I yet love it due to its really small size.

      BTW, Sääksmäki is from my home about 100 km / 62 miles. Also the old stone church is beautiful, but I have not yet presented it here; maybe someday…

      Happy Sunday!

      Comment by sartenada — April 10, 2011 @ 09:42 | Reply

  8. Incredible… all these different tower ! A fantastic series… Thanks for sharing. Have a lovely sunday🙂

    Comment by Tamara — April 10, 2011 @ 12:04 | Reply

    • Salut Tamara.

      So nice that You took a tour around Finland from South to the North and from the West to the East with me and got the small idea how our country side is looking with these “specialties”.

      Happy Sunday to You too!

      Comment by sartenada — April 10, 2011 @ 12:31 | Reply

  9. Bonjour Sartenada,

    Wow! Tu as toujours de très jolies photos à nous présenter. Aujourd’hui, je suis éblouie par tous ces beaux clochers. J’adore leurs couleurs éclatantes et leur construction unique. On dirait des maisonnettes coquettes où l’on voudrait habiter, loin des regards indiscrets, perchées sur une lande parsemée de bonheur.

    Mais dis-moi Sartenada, à quoi serve ces clochers? À faire sonner la cloche? Est-ce un lieu pour prier?

    Bonne journée à toi! xx

    Comment by annejutras — April 10, 2011 @ 16:07 | Reply

    • Bonjour Anne.

      Merci beaucoup.

      Peut-être la question plus importante serait: Pourquoi sont-ils séparés de l’église elle-même. Il y a une réponse que si l’église est brûlée, comme il est arrivée souvent, le clocher a été sauvé. Beaucoup de clochers médiévales sont faites de pierre, mais il a été une matérial de construction très coûteuse. Parfois, quand le clocher a été détruit par le feu, le fond a été refaite de pierre et de la partie supérieure en bois.

      Dans qielques villages, le feu a détruit le clocher plusieurs fois, parfois deux fois et l’église aissi. Ainsi, sur la place reste la troisième église et clocher. Les incendies causés par la foudre ont été nombreux, mais aussi la manipulation négligente du feu a causé les feux.

      Les hautes tours on peut voir de loin et aussi des cloches de l’église avec la voix chaleureuse peut être entendu de loin. Aujourd’hui, il sont stockés les vieilles choses de nombreuses decennies ou peut-être des centaines d’années. Ainsi, beaucoup d’entre eux sont maintenant des musées du village.

      J’espère que ma réponse est assez bon pour toi.

      Belle journée!

      Comment by sartenada — April 11, 2011 @ 13:00 | Reply

      • Oui, cela répond parfaitement à ma question. J’imagine que les clochers coûtaient très cher, d’où leur mise en retrait de l’église. En tout cas, ce sont tous de belles constructions. Merci pour l’info!

        Bonne soirée!

        Comment by annejutras — April 15, 2011 @ 01:48 | Reply

  10. Well done!
    This is another fantastic collection from you.
    I have never seen so many beautiful belfries at a time.
    I must say that Finnish belfries are very interesting and colourful!
    My personal favourite would be Rantsila!
    Because it has “eyes”!

    Comment by London Caller — April 11, 2011 @ 02:24 | Reply

    • Hello London Caller.

      Thank You praising our belfries. It is true that they differ from those I have seen when on travel around the world. Your selection Rantsila is situated in the middle of Finland if we divided Finland into two parts vertically. It is small place and before it was united with three municipalities the number of habitants was only 2001 people.

      When I drove to there on one of my photographic tour the church was closed for visits. What a pity. The bell tower is older than the church which is from 1785, but I could not find the exact year of construction.

      Comment by sartenada — April 11, 2011 @ 07:16 | Reply

  11. toujours aussi belle tes photos.
    je te souhaite une bonne journée

    Comment by frammy — April 12, 2011 @ 12:58 | Reply

    • Bonjour Frammy.

      Merci de m’avoir fait un commentaire. Je suis heureux que mes photos te plaisaient.

      Belle journée.

      Comment by sartenada — April 12, 2011 @ 16:34 | Reply

  12. What a great idea, these are all so pretty. For me they are unusual too as I think the architecture and size is quite different from what I have seen in other countries. Taking you for coming over to my photo blog and sharing this🙂

    Comment by lena de almeida — April 4, 2013 @ 20:53 | Reply

    • Hello Lena.

      Thank You for Your kind comment. Yes they are indeed different as You noticed. So are also our churches on countryside. I have great series of fifteen posts of presenting unknown Poor-man statues. It is presenting not only statues, but everything around churches. Take a look. Today I just published the second last part of it.

      Have a lovely day!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 5, 2013 @ 07:36 | Reply

  13. This is very interesting, I don’t think I have ever seen a bell tower and you have seen so many. I think your photos are great.

    Comment by Tokeloshe — February 9, 2015 @ 02:03 | Reply

    • Hello Linda.

      Finland has surprises.🙂 Thank you commenting and sorry for my answer which took so long time to answer due to my short trip to the North.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — February 12, 2015 @ 12:27 | Reply


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