Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

October 1, 2010

Comparing belltowers III / Comparando campanarios III / Comparant Clochers III

37 belltowers / 37 campanarios / 37 Clochers.

Compare Belltowers I / Comparando campanarios I / Comparant Clochers I

Compare Belltowers II / Comparando campanarios II / Comparant Clochers II

Comparing bell towers IV / Comparando campanarios IV / Comparant Clochers IV

Hamina

Hamina

Iisalmi

Iisalmi

Ilomantsi

Ilomantsi

Kurikka

Kurikka

Kuusjoki

Kuusjoki

Lammi

Lammi

Lappajärvi

Lappajärvi

Lappeenranta

Lappeenranta

Lapua

Lapua

Lemi

Lemi

Lemu

Lemu

Lieksa

Lieksa

Liminka

Liminka

Lohja

Lohja

Lohtaja

Lohtaja

Masku

Masku

Närpes

Närpes

Nastola

Nastola

Nilsia

Nilsia

Noormarkku

Noormarkku

Nousiainen

Nousiainen

Oravainen

Oravainen

Orivesi

Orivesi

Oulainen

Oulainen

Övermark

Övermark

Parikkala

Parikkala

Parkano

Parkano

Perniö

Perniö

Pertteli

Pertteli


Pieksämäki

Pieksämäki

Piippola

Piippola

Porvoo

Porvoo

Pulkkila

Pulkkila

Pyhtää

Pyhtää

Vimpeli

Vimpeli

Ylihärmä

Ylihärmä

Ylitornio

Ylitornio

38 Comments »

  1. These bell-towers are very special and beautiful! I Denmark we build the tower on the church – nor beside it. And interesting how different these towers are in Finland… You must have been capturing towers for a long time!

    Comment by truels — October 1, 2010 @ 12:57 | Reply

    • Hello Truels.

      Thank You for Your comment. To build bell towers apart has good reasons in my country. When wooden churches are burnt by fire, then the church is burn, but not the bell tower. I guess that this is the main reason. We have a lot of wooden churches yet ramining, although many has been destroyed by lightning. Yore all the material was very expensive, hmm so it is nowadays also, this was one way to spend. I know here some small villages where two wooden churches have been burnt. The third is now from stone. The fact is that also in my country there are a lot of churches with bell towers beside them. I love how different these can be. Many of these bell towers are situated in small villages.

      You are right when saying that I have photographed churches and all around them for a long time. I started in 2005 and now I have photographed about 380 churches. Not all from inside, but anyway.

      Comment by sartenada — October 1, 2010 @ 13:30 | Reply

      • What a great work you have done shooting these church-towers, I think you should consider making a book with them! I have been reading this post several times, and every time I find some new towers, that are my favorites! Conclusion: They are all very special. I can’t wait to see, what your next subject in your next post is???!

        Comment by truels — October 6, 2010 @ 13:28 | Reply

      • Thank You again Truels.

        To make a book from our bell towers, or from wooden churches, is good idea and I have been thinking it myself also. There is a little “but”, all these are spread around my country and takes plenty of time and money to photograph them. Many times those “beauties” are situated on countryside, not on cities or towns. This means whirling roads with “slow” speed and nights in hotels or in hostels. I should have some “supporter” to my idea or Yours.

        Next post will be posted on Friday and the subject will be…🙂

        Thank You very much for Your comments.

        Comment by sartenada — October 6, 2010 @ 13:46 | Reply

  2. I always enjoy your photos of bell towers. I particularly like the very simple ones like, Ilomantsi, Kuusjoki and Lemu. I love the colouring of Lohja – is the top part newer than the base? The more elaborate ones are very beautiful too. I like the onion domes on Noormarkku and the three roofs on Lemi, and Nastola. They are all very individual and unique.

    Comment by Jackie queen — October 1, 2010 @ 14:24 | Reply

    • Hello Jackie.

      Thank You visiting with me these bell towers around my country. I tried to clearfy that bell tower of Lohja. Originally the lower part from stone was built at the Middle Ages, but no exact info. That what we can see in my photos is about from 1740 and its building master was a German called Friedrich Schultz.

      Lohja is nice small town which is situated from Helsinki about 60 kilometers and from my home 55 kilometers. My children and grandchildren are living in this town. The church is inside gorgeous and that can be found from my blog under category: Churches-stone.

      Comment by sartenada — October 1, 2010 @ 16:10 | Reply

  3. Hello Matti,
    Ils sont merveilleux, ces clochers, je sais je me répète, mais c’est tellement vrai !!😀
    J’aime le rouge, mais je n’ose pas dire qu’ils ont ma préférence car tous ont énormément de charme.
    Plus je vois ton pays, moins j’aime les cocotiers et les plages tropicales ! 😉
    Bises et bon week-end.
    Marion

    Comment by Marion B. — October 1, 2010 @ 16:20 | Reply

    • Salut Marion.

      Il n’a pas d’importance si tu te répètes. Tes paroles sont d’or pour mes oreilles. Je aime lire les commentaires de genre avec plaîsir, parce que tu comprends facilement que ces photos ont exigé beaucoup de voyages et de travail auprès de mon l’ordinateur. Peut être t’as prise garde que j’aime conduire ma bagnole beaucoup.🙂

      Bisous.

      Comment by sartenada — October 1, 2010 @ 16:39 | Reply

  4. Good morning, Matti,
    On Thursday I discovered no new images. I look every day on your page so I do not miss anything. I counted 37 pictures. All are in color, clear and excellent. For each photo I would if I could give more than 5 stars. All bell towers are very beautiful. Each is unique, beautiful and impressive than the other. The architecture and the colorful facade appear very welcoming and friendly. I noticed that some bell towers in part at the bottom of stone and the upper area are built of wood. In two photos, I rediscovered a figure on the facade. They told me in some pictures some time ago to attend what purpose these figures. The first picture is my favorite. The architecture of this church I like particularly well. From top to bottom, I also like the church towers in the pictures (3/6/7/15/16/18/22/24/27/32/35) particularly well. As you know, I visit very often in the Cologne area some churches. Each is different in architecture. I have never found a church in our region, which was built of wood. It would be very nice if I could discover at some point one. I thank you for allowing me to visit this site and look forward to the next series. We wish you and Anja, have a nice weekend and all the best on your daily common paths. Thank you for all the nice comments and stars on my web page. On the weekend following an e-mail.
    Dear greetings Christel and Detlev

    Comment by Christel — October 2, 2010 @ 02:41 | Reply

    • Hello Christel.

      Thank You visiting my site and leaving comment. You wrote that You saw in two photos figures. That’s right. They so called “Poor Man Statues”. There not existing anywhere else in our world. We have 106 Poor Man Statues showing men and one showing a woman. I like them very much. The problem to photograph them all, is they are spread all over my country. So to take photos from all of them take years. Last time I presented one in my blog presenting the wooden church of Kälviä. Some day, I think next winter, I’ll present all of them what I have photographed until now.

      The first photo is interesting, to me also. It belongs to a very special church from which I’ll make a post later this year.

      Schönes-Wochenende!

      Comment by sartenada — October 2, 2010 @ 11:52 | Reply

  5. I loved seeing all of your photos of the bell towers. Each one is interesting by itself and the architecture there is so beautiful! I can see why you would be proud of them!

    Comment by montucky — October 2, 2010 @ 03:49 | Reply

    • Hello Montucky.

      So nice to read that that You liked them. Happy weekend.

      Comment by sartenada — October 2, 2010 @ 11:53 | Reply

  6. All are beautiful bell towers with each having their own personality! Wow! I really like the Lohja. I see that your blue car was featured in a few photos too.🙂

    Comment by Anna Surface — October 2, 2010 @ 22:15 | Reply

    • Hello Anna.

      Thank You commenting my photos. Yes, my blue car. Let’s say that it is my “babe”. It has been serving me now faithfully about three and half years. Last summer it carried me from 1st, Jun to 31st, August 31 about 9000 kilometers / 5592 miles. From that trip I drove in Germany about 3500 kilometers / 2174 miles when we spent our car holiday there. When thinking that I am a senior citizen, I have driven a lot of kilometers / miles during short summer. So, I drove around my country from here to there photographing from churches to rare places worth for visit. When thinking all this, I think that my blue car deserve to be photographed from its respectable service.🙂 Maybe I am a little bit naïf but does it matter?

      Comment by sartenada — October 3, 2010 @ 08:44 | Reply

  7. Your pictures are most interesting and beautiful. I too have never seen bell towers separate from the church. I must ask around here to see if this idea came to Canada, even in a small way. Do the bells ever ring?

    Comment by Ruth — October 3, 2010 @ 14:13 | Reply

    • Hello Ruth.

      Thank You for Your interest and comment.

      The answer to Your question is: YES. Normally we have a divine service every Sunday at 10 of clock in the morning. Then before that they are calling people to worship; when the worship is over and people are leaving church, then again bells’ sound is nicely heard again. Of course when somebody has died, then also.

      Happy Sunday.

      Comment by sartenada — October 3, 2010 @ 14:21 | Reply

  8. Lors de mon voyage en Finlande en 1987, j’ai été séduite par ces clochers et j’en ai photographiés plusieurs que je reconnais. Mais il faut aussi pousser les portes de ces églises en bois qui renferment parfois des trésors…: Merci pour ces belles photos qui me rappellent d’excellents souvenirs. Bonne journée!😉

    PS: l’adresse de mon blog a changé.Voici la nouvelle
    http://moniquetdany.typepad.fr

    Comment by Monik — October 5, 2010 @ 11:48 | Reply

    • Bonjour Monik.

      Merci beaucoup de votre commentaire. Je suis très heureux de lire, que mes photos sont mise souvenirs à votre esprit de votre visite à mon pays. Nos églises en bois peut vraiment cacher des surprises à lui, qui ouvre les portes d’églises en bois.

      Merci pour le lien nouveaux.

      Amicalement. Matti.

      Comment by sartenada — October 5, 2010 @ 12:06 | Reply

  9. Hey Matti—

    My favorites are #’s 1 and the 14th one up from the bottom (the pink one)🙂

    Comment by jpcabit — October 5, 2010 @ 14:55 | Reply

  10. Hello Joseph.

    Thank You for Your visit and comment. Your selections are very good ones.

    Regards.

    Comment by sartenada — October 5, 2010 @ 17:09 | Reply

  11. Bonsoir
    se sont des belles cascades….cela devais etre une journée merveilleuse de décourvete agréable.
    je vous souhaite une bonne soirée.
    Cordialement, Frammy

    Comment by frammy — October 8, 2010 @ 23:05 | Reply

    • Bonjour Frammy.

      Merci de commenter si gentiment. Cela me réchauffe le cœur en lisant tes paroles.

      Belle journèe.

      Comment by sartenada — October 9, 2010 @ 09:05 | Reply

  12. Than-you!
    A well-illustrated collection.
    I’ll shortly upload my 1968 photo of Orivesi on flickr.
    But I’ve read that the belfry may have recently burnt down?!
    P
    flickr.com/peteshep/sets

    Comment by Peter Shep — August 3, 2011 @ 01:25 | Reply

    • Hi Peter.

      I checked it from Internet and it was the church itself which was burnt in 1958, not the bell tower. This is verified on the pages of congregation of Orivesi. Pages are in Finnish, sorry.

      Thank You for Your interest and commenting.

      Comment by sartenada — August 3, 2011 @ 07:10 | Reply

  13. I’ve recently recovered this 1969 mouldy slide of Petajavesi. (There’s also a detail shot coming.)
    042-PetajavesiFinland007 PS ©
    (May have to copy and paste into browser.)
    peteshep 🙂

    Comment by Peter Shep — August 3, 2011 @ 01:30 | Reply

  14. You might also be interested in this Set of 70 of a wooden church I restored in the 1970s in New Zealand:

    44 Wellington Old St Paul's ©

    P 🙂

    Comment by Peter Shep — August 3, 2011 @ 01:35 | Reply

    • Hello Peter.

      I checked it and it is really interesting! I have photographed in Finland until now 383 churches and mainly on our countryside; only few on big towns. This summer I had intention to take more photos, but due to the death of my father-in-law interrupted my planned trips.

      Thank You.

      Comment by sartenada — August 3, 2011 @ 07:19 | Reply

  15. And here’s my 1968 photo of Orivesi:
    039-Orivesi-009 PS ©

    Regards,
    Peteshep

    Comment by Peter Shep — August 3, 2011 @ 02:02 | Reply

  16. Peter,

    Your photo is very precious, because it is so old. When we visited in Orivesi, there was just beginning divine service and we could not take many photos, but maybe someday…

    Peter, If You still are interested in architecture, then take a look at my posts showing different towns in my blog (filed under Categories). Towns like Naantali, Hanko, Tammisaari, Rauma and Porvoo are full with wooden old, historic houses. Might be interesting?

    Regards, Matti.

    Comment by sartenada — August 3, 2011 @ 07:30 | Reply

  17. Thanks indeed Matti!
    I think you ‘ve solved the fire at Orivesi🙂
    Not the belfry-tower but the church. I guess there was an old wooden church which was burnt down and was replaced by the new one when I visited in 1968.
    There’s an excellent photo of the befry-tower, apparently taken 2010, on flickr, where it looks in splendid condition.
    Belfry of Orivesi Church

    Yes, I remember the old wooden buildings at Porvoo. From decades-ago-memory I think you have a Finnish name like Falu red for the traditional red-ochre. There was a very similar colour used here in early days. Also one of the Mediterranean ochres. I guess it comes from a stable natural pigment.

    I’ll enjoy going through more of your blog photos 🙂
    P🙂

    Comment by Peter Shep — August 3, 2011 @ 07:51 | Reply

    • Thank You Peter. You are welcome.

      Two years ago a young French student made a visit of five weeks in Finland studying the design of our churches for Paris university. Guess from who got the idea?🙂 I had only one day to meet her, because she travelled around our country. She can be seen in my post of Church of Lohja in photo number 20.

      During that one day I presented to her five churches travelling in my car from the morning to the evening.

      Comment by sartenada — August 3, 2011 @ 08:10 | Reply

  18. Do you also use the pseudonym Sir Vili? Many of your bell tower photos are identical—the same.

    Comment by Liisa Berg — March 18, 2012 @ 11:06 | Reply

    • Hello Liisa.

      That’s right. When I was retired from Finnair in 2004, I started my home pages with that pseudonym. They still exist, but some day I will remove them when I change my Internet connection provider. Maybe at the end of this year. Those pages I have not been updating for Years. Now I am blogging in WordPress and I love to be here. All visitors of my blog are great people.

      Happy Sunday!

      Comment by Sartenada — March 18, 2012 @ 11:46 | Reply

  19. Wow! You put a lot of effort into this beautiful post! I love it! Bell Tower are awesome!!

    Comment by Jodi — April 15, 2012 @ 12:38 | Reply

    • Hi Jodi.

      Thank You. I started to take digital photos by photographing our wooden churches. Quite soon I noticed that there also bell towers which are separated from churches. Then I noticed that inside churches there are beautiful chandeliers, altarpieces, pulpits, stained glass window etc. Then my eyes did found on cemeteries awesome memorials and finally I started to take photos from my Finland. My newest series of photos is “Beyond the Arctic Circle” with 14 posts and “South of Arctic Circle” with 3 posts. Finland is so unknown generally, but those regular readers of my blog have noticed interesting places, odd art etc.

      Happy Sunday!

      Comment by Sartenada — April 15, 2012 @ 17:13 | Reply

  20. Actually , I knew that in some places bell-towers are other than churches , but without ever seeing one of them!
    So thank you a lot!

    Comment by 76sanfermo — July 24, 2014 @ 11:25 | Reply

    • Hi Anna.

      Thank You leaving Your comment. To shoot photos from churches and our bell towers was a start of my photography. The idea came from Costa Rica.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — July 24, 2014 @ 11:31 | Reply


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