Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

April 13, 2010

Comparing belltowers II / Comparando campanarios II / Comparant Clochers II

In English:

Comparing belltowers

En español:

Comparando campanarios

En francais:

Comparant Clochers

25 belltowers / 25 campanarios / 25 Clochers.

Compare Belltowers I / Comparando campanarios I / Comparant Clochers I

Compare Belltowers III / Comparando campanarios III / Comparant Clochers III

Comparing bell towers IV / Comparando campanarios IV / Comparant Clochers IV

Irjanne

Irjanne

Jämsä

Jämsä

Joroinen

Joroinen

Joutsa

Joutsa

Juupajoki

Juupajoki

Kaavi

Kaavi

Kalajoki

Kalajoki

Kangasniemi

Kangasniemi

Kannus

Kannus

Kärsämäki1

Kärsämäki1

Karsämäki2

Kärsämäki2

Karstula

Karstula

Karttula

Karttula

Kaustinen

Kaustinen

Kemijärvi

Kemijärvi

Kempele

Kempele

Kerimäki

Kerimäki

Kesälahti

Kesälahti

Kivijärvi

Kivijärvi

Korpilahti

Korpilahti

Kortesjärvi

Kortesjärvi

Kristiinankaupunki

Kristiinankaupunki

Kruunupyy

Kruunupyy

Kuhmoinen

Kuhmoinen

Kuortane

Kuortane

16 Comments »

  1. All of your bell towers are so different, yet so similar in many ways. Each has usually one, two or three roofs, but then the colours, patterns, finishes and decorations are different. Finland is a very interesting country. I have just looked to see the tower at Karsamaki and found this photo on Flickr, which seems to be the same, very simple tower, taken from an unusual angle.

    http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=karsamaki&w=21648944%40N05

    Then I found this new church built by architects Lassila, Hirvilammi, which I don’t think you will like. I like the old buildings, but I am also very excited by modern architecture and feel that buildings must evolve. All new architecture is not bad.

    http://www.lh-ark.fi/kuvat/Lassila%20Hirvilammi%20architects%20ltd%20CV.pdf

    Comment by jackiequeen — April 13, 2010 @ 13:22 | Reply

    • Hello Jackie.

      Thank You commenting. I visited the hurch of Karsamaki in June 15th, 2007 with my wife. I have to say that it has “differ look” as seen from outside and from inside. For example inside there were furs of lambr on benches. To like this church is just matter of taste just as food or music. Maybe I’ll make a post of the church of Karsamaki some day.

      Comment by sartenada — April 13, 2010 @ 13:38 | Reply

  2. I’ve never seen so many bell towers. All of them are so unique. I really appreciate the ones of intricate detail.

    Comment by Preston — April 13, 2010 @ 16:52 | Reply

    • Hi Preston.

      So nice to read Your comment. Although in my country we do not have “so much of wonders of world”, these bell towers have been inspired me so many years I started to take photos. Then when I started to take photos from our churches I found that our bell towers are beautiful and they are “specials” in world, hmm maybe. Also they are good landmarks when driving and finding one’s way to the smallest villages.

      Thank You for Your interest and comment.

      Comment by sartenada — April 13, 2010 @ 17:12 | Reply

  3. Those towers are splendid! How beautiful! I would love to hear the bells.

    Comment by montucky — April 13, 2010 @ 20:40 | Reply

    • Hello Montucky.

      Some are really nice, but some are not. All this depends on how rich the parish was when bell tower was built and which is situation nowadays if one is thinking about renovation. I have heard quite many bells ringing when I was on my “photographic” car tour and I liked the sound.

      Comment by sartenada — April 14, 2010 @ 06:56 | Reply

  4. Good evening, Matti,
    I am very pleased that you bring something new. I missed you already. The bell towers are all very beautiful and very different. The architecture and colors of the exterior facades like it very much. It radiates harmony and peace. I would love to make a trip to Finland in order to experience everything in place. In your photos I see that it is there beautiful. You give it color, clear, brilliant against. I am grateful that I could look at this page. I wish you and Anja all the best on your daily routes. I am looking forward to the next pictures. Thanks for your nice comment. Dear greetings Christel

    Comment by Christel — April 14, 2010 @ 00:09 | Reply

    • Guten morgen Christel.

      Well, I have been busy, sorry. Thank You for Your interest towards our bell towers. If You come some day to Finland making car holiday, so let me know, because I might have some ideas to give. From there You live, You could easily drive through Denmark and Sweden and then take a boat from Stockholm to Turku. Yesterday I was in Helsinki and reserved our ship tickets (from June 5 to June 17) to Germany (Rostock). At this moment we do not have any special destination what we want to see, but the general destination is towards Schwarzwald. After looking in our TV, series “Die Schwarzwaldklinik” or in English The Black Forest Clinic, so we are quite inspired by it and we want see all those scenic routes. But let us see what will be our final route, because to June there is so much time.

      Comment by sartenada — April 14, 2010 @ 07:13 | Reply

  5. That was very interesting. Is this typical that the bell towers are separate from the church or other building that they are associated with? I’ve never seen a bell tower separate like that. It makes them distinct…almost like a lighthouse.

    Comment by kateri — April 14, 2010 @ 04:00 | Reply

    • Hello Kateri.

      So nice to read that You found something interesting in my post. Then to Your question. Answer is Yes and No. In the historic days they were generally separated and so it is mainly still nowadays. One reason why they are separated are fires. If a church was burnt in fire (by lightning), so the bell tower was saved or vice versa. When dividing Finland from the North to the South in two parts from the middle, so on the Western side there mainly churches along coast line built from stone and on the Eastern side churches are wooden churches. If You look the bell tower of Kerimaki, You’ll found that its lower part is from stone and the upper part is wooden.

      We have a proverb: “church in the middle of village”. This was true in the past, but times are changing and sometimes the church is located in 4-5 miles from the center of modern village center. And now notice, that these bell towers are generally located in small town, villages, but not in cities.

      Comment by sartenada — April 14, 2010 @ 07:28 | Reply

  6. How intriguing with so many different and unique bell towers! I’ve seen a few bell towers in my time and here in the Kansas prairie, but these have such distinct designs. I really, really like the last photo of Kuortane. Beautiful! And how very interesting, your reply to Kateri about the bell towers built separate due to fires, and the dividing of Finland from the North to the South, and those on the coastline built from stone and on the Eastern of wood. That is gorgeous stonework of the Kerimäki, and a lovely bell tower.

    Comment by Anna Surface — April 16, 2010 @ 16:08 | Reply

    • Hello Anna.

      I am glad that these bell towers pleased to You. The bell tower of Kuortane is good example of planning / architecture and handsmancraft. What comes to the bell tower of Kerimäki, it is also used as “lookout spot”. This is very understandable, because the height of it is 42 meters / 138 feet. The church of Kerimäki is the biggest wooden church in the world.

      Happy weekend.

      Comment by sartenada — April 16, 2010 @ 16:30 | Reply

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    Pingback by Comparing belltowers III / Comparando campanarios III / Comparant Clochers III « Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada — October 1, 2010 @ 06:21 | Reply

  8. Nice story about these different churches.

    Comment by Sylvie — January 24, 2011 @ 18:49 | Reply

    • Bonjour Sylvie.

      I am so glad that You saw these bell towers. They are really different. They are very close to my heart. When driving to some small village, one can see from far away two towers, one of the church and the other from the bell tower.

      Belle Journèe.

      Comment by sartenada — January 25, 2011 @ 07:33 | Reply

  9. This is a beautiful presentation of bell towers. Very impressive. I am interested in the last one in Kuortane, do you know when that church was built, what year?

    Thank you for your talents.

    Roberta

    Comment by Roberta Kuoppa-Aho Annala — February 24, 2011 @ 21:16 | Reply


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