Sartenada's photo blog / Blog de foto de Sartenada

March 8, 2010

Native American life

My background concerning about American Indians and Wild Frontier.

My interest in American Indians started in 1954 and when my family moved from Helsinki close to small town called Varkaus. I bought plenty of comics and among them I found interesting stories about American Indians and the West (Wild Frontier) also. My soul was sold to travel far away, to meet in these adventures heroes and villains. I remember some names of those comics: Pecos Bill, Captain Miki, King of the Royal Mounted which stories were written by “Romer Grey” and “Gaylord DuBois”. Also “Tex Willer”. Tex Willer was leader of the Navajo tribe, although he was a white man. In Tex Willer is shown up also Kit Carson. I do not know if these “heroes” are known nowadays.

Also I read plenty of books telling about Wid Frontier and American Indians. Among them I was extremely inspired about books of Zane grey. Few years ago I read all these books published in Finnish and some in Spanish. If one is interested in horses, riding, American Indians, love, feelings of human mind, flowers and nature, then these books are for him / her. Of course I read other books like: “The last of the Mohicans” by Fenimore Cooper and books by Karl May. Books by James Oliver Curwood had also impact to me, although they did not tell about American Indians. Also the film telling from Davy Crockett in Battle of the Alamo, impacted me.

Especially I was impressed by the book “Betty Zane” by Zane Grey. From these books I learned to know American Indians and their thoughts. Later when I started to learn English, I ordered, me a schoolboy, from the States a magazine called “Arizona Highways” and now I am talking times dating back upto 50 years. In this magazine I saw for the first time color photos from Native Indians and their life.

All these inspired me so much, mixing in my mind Indians and Wild Frontier, that I learned myself to move in forest like an Indian, without any noise and also to read signs of nature, animals and humans. In army 1965/1966 (artillery) I was trained for to give artillery fire commands, but when in military exercises, I was selectied to act as a scout to find out enemy’s movements (to reconnoiter), so natural!

Related links:

Tex Willer
Pecos Bill
Kit Carson
Zane Grey
Karl May
James Fenimore Cooper
James Oliver Curwood
Davy Crockett
Davy Crockett – King of the Wild Frontier
Ernie LaPointe
Native american history and culture3

The exhibition of life and the times of Sitting Bull.

The exhibition told about the life and the times of Sitting Bull (Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake). There were videos (old movies), music, old photos from Sitting Bull, his tribe, his wives, his tomb, handwork and much more. Also on walls there were interesting texts telling about Sitting Bull’s life. Anyway, my photos tell more to You than my words. Sitting Bull’s daughter’s grandchild Ernie LaPointe, 61 years old, honored this exhibition at opening day!

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull, Tatanka Iyotaka

Sitting Bull in Wikipedia

24 Comments »

  1. Good morning, Matti
    this aspect is very interesting. The garments and moccasins of the Indians are very splendid, imaginative and colorful. I think that it was connected with a lot of effort and skill to produce them. Karl May movies I watched with great interest, and books are known to me. About Sitting Bull and the lifestyle of the Indians have been informed a bit. Many years ago, I began to interest me for it. To see and experience everything that interests me, I would go round the world. Who knows, maybe someday it works. I am grateful that I could look at this page.
    You and Anja, I wish good luck and health to your daily routes. I look forward to the next pages, and thank you for your comment. e-mail follows.
    Dear greetings Christel

    Comment by Christel — March 8, 2010 @ 13:10 | Reply

    • Thank You Christel showing Your interest towards my post. As You saw I gave a lot of personal touch to this post. We are so many different people and that is why I thought how much my personal touch I can give here. Maybe I succeeded when giving my background. Anyway, I found the life of Indians very interesting. In Finland we have also native people, they are Sami-people or Laplanders. In the most Norther part of Finland, that is called Lapland, one can see them. Also Ernie LaPointe met them and had talks with them.

      Comment by sartenada — March 8, 2010 @ 13:17 | Reply

  2. I loved old films about cowboys and Indians and played these games as a child. But, all of these old films glamorized the life of the cowboy and made it ‘right’ to wipe out whole tribes of Indians. Here in Nova Scotia the First Nations are the Mi’kmaq. Today the Micmac are a tiny minority based on small reservations of the poorest land. The Canadian Government feels great guilt of the way these people were treated.

    This site tells a little about the history of the Micmac.

    http://museum.gov.ns.ca/arch/infos/mikmaq1.htm

    Thank you for another interesting Blog.

    Comment by Jackie Queen — March 8, 2010 @ 15:49 | Reply

    • Hello Jackie Queen.

      So interesting Your comment and many thanks to You from Your link, which I checked with great interest.

      When living on countryside between the ages 10 and 22, I had not so many possibilities to watch movies, but only very occasionally and that was why I was reading much, really much. This hobby is still continuing, because in my home library I have few thousands of books in many languages. Later (at the age of 22) when I moved back to Helsinki to seek job, I looked these Hollywood films and I think I saw them in different light, because I had been read so much. I know the name Micmac, but without having any info until now, thanks to Your link.

      Comment by sartenada — March 8, 2010 @ 16:04 | Reply

  3. I have also had an interest in Indian cultures since early childhood, and like you, practiced may of the Indian ways of traveling in the wild country, and indeed, still do. It is a way of understanding and relating to the natural world practically unknown to other cultures, in particular the feeling of “oneness” with the natural world (here, in the mountains).

    Here are links to two sites you might enjoy seeing, Ktunaxa Nation, and Char-Koosta News.

    Comment by montucky — March 9, 2010 @ 04:35 | Reply

  4. (Sorry about the repeated comments: I attempted to correct the first one and made a mess!

    Comment by montucky — March 9, 2010 @ 04:36 | Reply

    • Hello Montucky.

      No problem. I deleted three (very, very similar) posts and so the two last are seen here with links.

      Very interesting to read that You have had interest in Indian cultures also as me. I can imagine those mighty landscapes of Montana where You spend Your time outdoors and enjoy the feeling of “Freedom” as a part of nature. Thank You also for Your links.

      BTW, there is one curiosity in my photos #12 and #13. I am just wondering why in Tomahawk there is a hole which is in form of heart. Did You noticed and pondered it what is the meaning of that?

      Comment by sartenada — March 9, 2010 @ 07:11 | Reply

  5. What a fantastic collection..you know I’ve never understood why they were called Indians

    Comment by Sean — March 10, 2010 @ 06:25 | Reply

  6. Hello Sean.

    I know that I should have had to use term “Native Americans” or “American Indian” instead of Indians, but I am so old man and when in my youth I learned something, I bear it in my mind until I am passing away. Sorry if I gave umbrage to somebody. The name Indian is coming from Christopher Columbus (1451 – 1506) who was seeking the seaway to India and when he arrived to the Caribbean islands, he found natives and believed that he was in India, so he called them “Indios”.

    Nice to read that You liked this.

    Comment by sartenada — March 10, 2010 @ 07:24 | Reply

  7. That was a great exhibition of Native American artifacts. I really like how you said your “soul was sold to travel far away” which occurred through your reading of the comics. How true your saying is because we can all transplant ourselves and our souls to another land through reading, and through photography. It is good sometimes to escape our own lives through another medium, even if only temporarily. Thank you for your interesting blog.

    Comment by luchaniktravel — June 9, 2012 @ 08:21 | Reply

  8. Hi Luchaniktravel.

    Thank You. I really appreciate Your answer to my post. I saw in it that You did understand my enthusiasm for historic western life. In those comics and books, especially in those written by Zane Grey, good people win and bad people suffer a defeat, meaning that justice always wins.

    Have a nice week-end!

    Comment by Sartenada — June 9, 2012 @ 10:22 | Reply

  9. I read with interest your great enthusiasm for Native American history and culture. Zane Grey grew up in Ohio, and there is a museum dedicated to him in his home town of Zanesville.

    Ohio was the center of Native American civilization that was located east of the Mississippi 2000 years ago, but their culture collapsed. However this ancient culture was very artistic and made beautiful effigy pipes (pipes used for smoking that are typically shaped to look like an animal). I was at an exhibit of their works this spring, and tried to take photos through the glass cases like you did above. I hope to post the photos within the next week or two.

    This Native American civilization (the Hopewell culture) is famous for its earthworks – huge structures made by creating mounds of earth. I wrote one of my first articles about them here: http://trekohio.com/2012/05/14/the-largest-geometric-earthworks-in-the-world/

    Ohio is also the location of a huge flint quary that Native Americans used. I have visited here and will write that up later, too.

    Comment by Deb Platt — June 12, 2012 @ 15:19 | Reply

    • Hi Deb.

      Oh, thank You very much for Your very interesting comment. I am very happy about it. I love Zane Grey’s book. In them the justice wins and the heart knows who just the right person is. In many of his books the main person is she (female). That museum must be awesome. To take photos thru glasses is not easy. It is possible without flash and then You need big ISO setting. In those cases I use ISO 3200. Some photos would be nice surprise.

      Have a lovely day!

      Comment by Sartenada — June 12, 2012 @ 15:29 | Reply

  10. I am amazed at the variety of topics you cover in your photo displays. It’s incredible. My husband and I are fascinated with the old west history. We are from B.C. Canada and love to visit ghost towns. We know about the story of Kit Carson and we actually bought some property in one of the areas where he frequented in Colorado. One famous quote from Kit Carson, very comical. He was asked in later years if he had ever been lost. “No, never lost. There have been times where I didn’t know where I was…….but I was never lost.”

    Comment by Rosh — February 26, 2014 @ 08:26 | Reply

    • Hello Rosh.

      I am very happy that You checked this post. It might be impossible to understand how much I lived in old west thru my comics and books. Some day when You have time, check which kind museum we have in Finland. My favorite one is

      International coffee cup museum.

      Maybe unique in the world.

      Happy Wednesday!

      Comment by Sartenada — February 26, 2014 @ 11:14 | Reply

  11. This post is very interesting, with lots of detailed photos. The bead-work especially is wonderful.
    I have read some books by Zane Grey and many by Louise L’amour http://www.louislamour.com/

    Comment by Tokeloshe — October 29, 2014 @ 21:22 | Reply

    • Hi Linda.

      Thank You for Your interest concerning this post. Zane Grey is the best writer to describe Old West, life at those days, justice, human heart, life, horses, riding and much more. There are three subjects in his books which I raise above other subjects: nature, justice and true love! Also he has described excellently how to make rail roads.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Comment by Sartenada — October 30, 2014 @ 08:28 | Reply

  12. I’ve just discovered this 2010 post!
    I realize I know very little about NativeAmericans’ culture , or only approximately …
    Your detailed photos help me to learn much more about it ,so thanks once again!

    Comment by 76sanfermo — November 5, 2014 @ 11:15 | Reply

    • Chiao Anna.

      I am great fan of historic old west. In Italy there are also some who loves Western things. I have for example “huge” collection of adventues of Tex Willer. In Italy there is for example this blog:

      Tex Willer blog (in italiano).

      Thank You commenting.

      Have a great day!

      Comment by Sartenada — November 5, 2014 @ 12:09 | Reply

  13. I’m glad you gave me this link–it’s so interesting to see how fascinated you were with tales of the American Old West. You might be interested in a series of mystery books, written by Tony Hillerman. They are set in the late 20th-century, in the Southwest US–they give a more modern view of Native Americans in US culture, and the author is a great storyteller. The exhibit of artifacts you photographed looks like an amazing collection! I especially love the beaded items.

    Comment by KerryCan — February 2, 2015 @ 12:25 | Reply

    • Hello Kerry.

      I appreciate very much Your praising comment. Also I very am happy to get more Your information about modern Native Americans in US culture thru Your hints. Thank You. My wife who is beader also admired very much those beaded items.🙂

      Have a great start of new week.

      Comment by Sartenada — February 2, 2015 @ 12:56 | Reply

  14. This is an incredible post. The history from your photos is there to see and experience…I’ve never would have imagined anyone could see such a collection in Europe. Beautiful pieces, and that alone says so much about the culture. What perhaps impresses me the most, is how you went out and truly learned the life and understood the life having been a continent away. You know more than 99% of people in North American I would imagine🙂 Simply an awesome post. Well done.

    Comment by Dalo 2013 — November 4, 2015 @ 05:16 | Reply

    • Hi Randall.

      Oh, thank You very much for Your praising comment. It warmed my heart on this cold Morning and I am sure that this day will be great day.

      Have a nice day!

      Comment by Sartenada — November 5, 2015 @ 08:50 | Reply

      • Wish you well, and love the attitude you have facing the day🙂 Cheers.

        Comment by Dalo 2013 — November 5, 2015 @ 16:27 | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: